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Office 2011 etc.
 


2016-07-15 at 15:27 #1088   (1)
Yesterday I ran into the apparently common MS error message "Some chart types cannot be combined with other chart types. Select a Different chart type." Selecting any chart type gave the same message.

I'm running 2011 for Mac. I had just shown a friend how to create and add to an XY-scatter chart from an existing workbook. We then downloaded his data in a .txt file and imported. When I selected the two columns and hit insert, the message appeared. I had never seen this before. After googling around and seeing many horrible suggestions - including the ever popular nuke and rebuild, it turns out the solution was simple.

When imported, the tab names were the original file names of the form solnn.txt All we had to do was delete the period (".") in the tab name and all was well. Nothing else needed.

I love Microsoft.


2016-09-16 at 11:58 #5352   (2)
Office for Mac 2011 will no longer be available for installation [after 2016-09-21]

Thank you for using Office 365. Beginning September 22, 2016, Office for Mac 2011 will no longer be available for download and installation. Customer support and troubleshooting will end October 10, 2017.

To ensure the security of your Office suite and to get all of the latest features, upgrade to Office 2016 for Mac for free as part of your Office 365 subscription.
Elsewhere at Microsoft there is a statement,

If you have a one-time purchase of Office for Mac 2011, you will still be able to install your Office using your product key.


2016-11-16 at 22:59 #9342   (3)
The Office 2011 14.7.0 Update broke Excel's display of the thousands separators in number and currency formatting. This is broken on both of my Snow Leopard Macs. It works on my El Capitan Mac.

To be sure it wasn't a corrupt spreadsheet on both Snow Leopard Macs, I quit Excel, created a new spreadsheet, and entered some numbers in a column. I selected the column and opened Format > Cells. Then I selected Number and checked Use 1000 Separator (,). The comma (standard USA separator) did not appear in any of the cells. I also tried Currency - the comma did not appear. When I check the column's format, it shows that Use 1000 Separator (,) is checked.

I copied the spreadsheet to my El Capitan Mac, and the commas appear as expected.

Can readers verify if their Snow Leopard Excel has this issue? Are other versions of OS X affected?

The good news is that I didn't upgrade dozens of my clients' Macs yet.


2016-11-17 at 14:51 #9390   (4)
The latest Excel update also broke pasting data with tab delimiters. Where the last version would properly put each tab-separated string into separate columns, the updated version improperly changes the tabs to spaces and dumps the whole lot into one cell. The workaround is to Paste Special and select the "Text" option (it will be defaulted to "Unicode Text."


2016-11-18 at 06:27 #9464   (5)
(2016-11-16 at 22:59)CyborgSam wrote:  The Office 2011 14.7.0 Update broke Excel's display of the thousands separators in number and currency formatting. This is broken on both of my Snow Leopard Macs. It works on my El Capitan Mac.

To be sure it wasn't a corrupt spreadsheet on both Snow Leopard Macs, I quit Excel, created a new spreadsheet, and entered some numbers in a column. I selected the column and opened Format > Cells. Then I selected Number and checked Use 1000 Separator (,). The comma (standard USA separator) did not appear in any of the cells. I also tried Currency - the comma did not appear. When I check the column's format, it shows that Use 1000 Separator (,) is checked.

I copied the spreadsheet to my El Capitan Mac, and the commas appear as expected.

Can readers verify if their Snow Leopard Excel has this issue? Are other versions of OS X affected?

The good news is that I didn't upgrade dozens of my clients' Macs yet.

Hi CyborgSam. I just tested this on a Mac Pro running Mac OS X 10.6.8 Client with Office 2011 updated to 14.7.0.

1. Created new spreadsheet
2. Entered some numbers in column A above 1000
3. Selected column A
4. Format > Cells > Number + ticked "Use 1000 Separator (,)"

The cells were formatted correctly with the 1000 separator (,) showing.


2016-11-18 at 09:42 #9470   (6)
Guest
Re Excel 14.7.0 currency and tab-delimited copy/paste problems, neither of these occur with me under OS 10.6.8....


2016-11-18 at 22:42 #9536   (7)
(2016-11-16 at 22:59)CyborgSam wrote:  The Office 2011 14.7.0 Update broke Excel's display of the thousands separators in number and currency formatting. This is broken on both of my Snow Leopard Macs. It works on my El Capitan Mac.
It's my Macs. I finally got on a client's Mac and tested, it works. I also logged into a virgin account on one of my Macs and it works. Thanks to MacStrategy and Guest for checking.

Clearly some 3rd-party software I used on both Macs is causing the issue. I won't bother diagnosing unless someone has the same issue and needs assistance.

The good news once again involves my client's Macs. I get to make some money this weekend upgrading them!


2017-03-31 at 15:54 #17403   (8)
I'm using Microsoft Office 2011 on a Mac running Mavericks (10.9.5). Via Microsoft AutoUpdate (MAU) I had installed all Office updates through the 14.7.1 update released in December 2016. Sometime after it was released on Jan 30, MAU (version 2.3.6 installed) started pushing an update to itself, MAU 3.8.3. However, upon downloading this and starting the install, it says that this update requires OS 10.10 (Yosemite) although the system requirements for Office 2011 are for OS 10.5.8. This update did install correctly on another Mac in the household running OS 10.11.

Since late Jan. this is the only update that MAU offers me. However, Microsoft released Office 2011 update 14.7.2 (security update) on March 14. This update has not been offered to me, but was offered to the Mac that successfully installed MAU 3.8.3. I was able to manually download and install the 14.7.2 update on the Mac running OS 10.9.5, as the requirements for the 14.7.2 update are only for OS 10.5.8.

Anyone else run into this or been able to "fix" MAU? Note that Microsoft has stated that updates for Office 2011 will end this October. (Heading off the inevitable question about why am I worrying about security updates for Office when I'm running an OS that stopped getting security updates - yes, I will be upgrading the OS fairly soon, when I make time for dealing with the issues that will arise from that).


2017-03-31 at 17:11 #17406   (9)
Guest
(2017-03-31 at 15:54)Bruce Blakely wrote:  Anyone else run into this or been able to "fix" MAU? Note that Microsoft has stated that updates for Office 2011 will end this October. (Heading off the inevitable question about why am I worrying about security updates for Office when I'm running an OS that stopped getting security updates - yes, I will be upgrading the OS fairly soon, when I make time for dealing with the issues that will arise from that).
We talked a bit about this over here:

  https://www.macintouch.com/forums/showth...0#pid16660

For now, I would just download future update files and manually install them yourself if the problem continues.


2017-06-16 at 10:37 #20780   (10)
The 14.7.5 update failed repeatedly for me, stalling after the download was complete but before the Install was to begin, with no error message from the Auto Updater.

Only after several tries did I realize that the Equation Editor was still running. Once I quit that, the update went through without a hitch.

The Auto Updater is smart enough to put up an error message if a major part of Office is running, but not if a minor part like the Equation Editor is running. So if you hit a stall, check for minor parts of Office that may still be running.


2017-06-19 at 11:31 #20918   (11)
I wonder whether people realize that, presumably for security reasons, Office 2016 will not open older Word files, such as those created by the famous Word 5. My contacts at Microsoft indicate that the change was made as part of an Office-wide security task in 2008, and that consequently Office 2011 should not open them, but I've found that it does.

What this means is that if one has old Word 5 files lying around and loses access to Office 2011 after upgrading to High Sierra / APFS, because Office 2011 won't run on it, those files could become unreadable.


2017-06-19 at 13:13 #20934   (12)
Guest
(2017-06-19 at 11:31)odysseus wrote:  I wonder whether people realize that, presumably for security reasons, Office 2015 will not open older Word files, such as those created by the famous Word 5. My contacts at Microsoft indicate that the change was made as part of an Office-wide security task in 2008, and that consequently Office 2011 should not open them, but I've found that it does.

What this means is that if one has old Word 5 files lying around and loses access to Office 2011 after upgrading to High Sierra / APFS, because Office 2011 won't run on it, those files could become unreadable.
I would use OpenOffice or its variations. Typically, they can read rather old files. Older versions of OpenOffice could even read WordPerfect files.


2017-06-19 at 13:25 #20939   (13)
(2017-06-19 at 11:31)odysseus wrote:  I wonder whether people realize that, presumably for security reasons, Office 2015 will not open older Word files, such as those created by the famous Word 5. My contacts at Microsoft indicate that the change was made as part of an Office-wide security task in 2008, and that consequently Office 2011 should not open them, but I've found that it does.
  What this means is that if one has old Word 5 files lying around and loses access to Office 2011 after upgrading to High Sierra / APFS, because Office 2011 won't run on it, those files could become unreadable.
I don't have any old Word 5 files at hand but I wonder if Pages can open them. Or TextEdit.


2017-06-19 at 14:51 #20961   (14)
(2017-06-19 at 11:31)odysseus wrote:  I wonder whether people realize that, presumably for security reasons, Office 2015 will not open older Word files, such as those created by the famous Word 5. My contacts at Microsoft indicate that the change was made as part of an Office-wide security task in 2008, and that consequently Office 2011 should not open them, but I've found that it does.
I believe that they won't "open with double-click" but can still be opened with the "File" -> "Open" menu.

Slightly related, files without ".doc" at the end (as many older files were named) may benefit from having that extension added to the filename.

LibreOffice and derrivatives are always useful for legacy file formats - open the old, then save it as a modern file fomat for posterity.


2017-06-19 at 19:57 #20995   (15)
(2017-06-19 at 11:31)odysseus wrote:  What this means is that if one has old Word 5 files lying around and loses access to Office 2011 after upgrading to High Sierra / APFS, because Office 2011 won't run on it, those files could become unreadable.
One second. Office 2011, which I use and need, won't run on High Sierra? Or it won't run on the APFS file system? Will it run on High Sierra without APFS?


2017-06-19 at 22:05 #21004   (16)
(2017-06-19 at 19:57)RobertB wrote:  One second. Office 2011, which I use and need, won't run on High Sierra? Or it won't run on the APFS file system? Will it run on High Sierra without APFS?
From another MacInTouch discussion, Office 2011 runs fine on High Sierra; it is APFS that it won't run on:

  https://www.macintouch.com/forums/showth...4#pid20804


2017-06-20 at 12:29 #21037   (17)
(2017-06-19 at 14:51)j-beda wrote:  I believe that they won't "open with double-click" but can still be opened with the "File" -> "Open" menu.
No -- in Word 2016, certain older files can't even be opened using File > Open. Thanks for the tip about LibreOffice.


2017-06-20 at 12:33 #21039   (18)
(2017-06-19 at 13:25)lymond wrote:  I don't have any old Word 5 files at hand but I wonder if Pages can open them. Or TextEdit.
Pages can't -- just tried it.


2017-06-20 at 20:23 #21080   (19)
(2017-06-19 at 22:05)David Fink wrote:  From another MacInTouch discussion, Office 11 runs fine on High Sierra; it is APFS that it won't run on:
  https://www.macintouch.com/forums/showth...4#pid20804
OK. Then I assume APFS is not a requirement for High Sierra (although it has advantages over the current file system).


2017-06-21 at 12:33 #21115   (20)
(2017-06-19 at 11:31)odysseus wrote:  ... Office 2016 will not open older Word files, such as those created by the famous Word 5 ...
I've had very good luck opening old Word 5 files using the freeware Growly Write, which maintains all the formatting I've ever used from the 1990s, including headers, footers, italics, bold, et al. If I understand correctly, Growly Write's developer is retired from that tiny company in Redmond where he worked as Word 5's developer.
(No relation.)


2017-06-21 at 14:28 #21131   (21)
(2017-06-21 at 12:33)walter.dufresne wrote:  I've had very good luck opening old Word 5 files using the freeware Growly Write...
Great tip! I have some old Word docs (not sure what version of Word, but they date from around 1995, and "Get Info" suggests "Word 1x -5x" as the "kind") that Office 2011 will open from the file-open menu, but the formatting is so messed up that the document is unreadable. Growly Write opened them up with only a few formatting glitches (which look to be Endnote and Mathtype issues).

I am going to try the Growly Photo app next. Thanks.


2017-06-22 at 01:00 #21161   (22)
(2017-06-20 at 12:33)odysseus wrote:  
(2017-06-19 at 13:25)lymond wrote:  I don't have any old Word 5 files at hand but I wonder if Pages can open them. Or TextEdit.
Pages can't -- just tried it.
I am on El Capitan, and have very old Word files. The workaround is to Get Info and change it to open all Word files as a Pages document. I just tested it, and, indeed, it worked. You can also select to save it as a Word document, which adds the .doc on the end....


2017-06-22 at 12:03 #21182   (23)
(2017-06-21 at 14:28)myoung wrote:  I have some old Word docs (not sure what version of Word, but they date from around 1995, and "Get Info" suggests "Word 1x -5x" as the "kind") that Office 2011 will open from the file-open menu, but the formatting is so messed up that the document is unreadable. Growly Write opened them up with only a few formatting glitches (which look to be Endnote and Mathtype issues).
This is a crucial point if you have important old documents. Despite being a de facto standard, .doc/.docx files are not compatible between different versions of Microsoft Word. I had some Word 5.1 files that were essentially gibberish in more recent versions. They weren't overly complicated documents, but they did have figures and formulas.

I was able to "modernize" them by opening them in an intermediate version of Word (I believe I used Word X, but it could have been Word 08), which was able to save them in a manner comprehensible to what was then the current version (probably Word 11 at the time). I haven't checked them in Office 2016, but probably should. Fortunately, these are files that aren't important, just of interest to me.

The idea that MS Office files are a reliable standard is a fiction. They aren't compatible between different versions and, even more so, aren't fully compatible between contemporaneous versions on different platforms.


2017-06-22 at 19:36 #21219   (24)
(2017-06-22 at 12:03)leet wrote:  I was able to "modernize" them by opening them in an intermediate version of Word (I believe I used Word X, but it could have been Word 08), which was able to save them in a manner comprehensible to what was then the current version (probably Word 11 at the time). I haven't checked them in Office 2016, but probably should. Fortunately, these are files that aren't important, just of interest to me.
I went through a similar process. I modernized my Word 5.1 documents using Word 2004. An important issue was maintaining the correct "Created" and "Modified' metadata with the files. To deal with that, I used an AppleScript app called "Backdater.app". I learned about Backdater from a 2011 post to MacInTouch (item.143261). Unfortunately, the site (http://FlixtonSoftware.Com/) is no longer online.

Backdater worked very well and was an important part of the workflow to modernize these Word documents.


2017-06-22 at 22:27 #21222   (25)
cmm
We have used Document Converter (in the App Store) to update old Word documents to newer formats. I don't remember having any problems with the app or the conversions.


2017-06-23 at 04:30 #21229   (26)
(2017-06-22 at 19:36)David Blanchard wrote:  An important issue was maintaining the correct "Created" and "Modified' metadata with the files. To deal with that, I used an AppleScript app called "Backdater.app". I learned about Backdater from a 2011 post to MacInTouch (item.143261). Unfortunately, the site (http://FlixtonSoftware.Com/) is no longer online.

Backdater worked very well and was an important part of the workflow to modernize these Word documents.
Thanks for the mention David. I am the originator of Backdater.app but FlixtonSoftware is no longer there. If anyone is interested, you can now find Backdater here.

As in my original posting six years ago, I would never encourage anyone to just run a script from someone you don’t know (i.e. me). I'd recommend that you first open it with AppleScript Editor to confirm that it only does what I claimed.

The old MacInTouch thread in which David found my posting is a great source of information on this issue. We’ve all been here six years ago!


abusbey Show this Post
2017-06-23 at 12:45 #21251   (27)
abusbey
LibreOffice does a great job of reading old Office formats of all sorts - and then you can just save in modern Office formats.


2017-06-23 at 12:54 #21253   (28)
(2017-06-22 at 19:36)David Blanchard wrote:  I modernized my Word 5.1 documents using Word 2004. An important issue was maintaining the correct "Created" and "Modified' metadata with the files. To deal with that, I used an AppleScript app called "Backdater.app". I learned about Backdater from a 2011 post to MacInTouch (item.143261). Unfortunately, the site (http://FlixtonSoftware.Com/) is no longer online.
The venerable tool, "A Better Finder Attributes", supports modifying file metadata, including creation dates and modification times. (The developer also makes the excellent "A Better Finder Rename" utility.)


2017-06-23 at 13:05 #21256   (29)
(2017-06-22 at 12:03)leet wrote:  This is a crucial point if you have important old documents. Despite being a de facto standard, .doc/.docx files are not compatible between different versions of Microsoft Word. I had some Word 5.1 files that were essentially gibberish in more recent versions. They weren't overly complicated documents, but they did have figures and formulas.
   I was able to "modernize" them by opening them in an intermediate version of Word (I believe I used Word X, but it could have been Word 08), which was able to save them in a manner comprehensible to what was then the current version (probably Word 11 at the time). I haven't checked them in Office 2016, but probably should. Fortunately, these are files that aren't important, just of interest to me.
   The idea that MS Office files are a reliable standard is a fiction. They aren't compatible between different versions and, even more so, aren't fully compatible between contemporaneous versions on different platforms.
There are indeed different versions of Office documents. There are:
  • "legacy" versions prior to Office 97 Win/Office 98 Mac - these are usually version and platform specific

  • Office 97 Win/Office 98 Mac to Office 2003 Win/Office 2004 Mac - with the relaunch of Office for Mac (Office 98), the goal of the Microsoft Macintosh Business Unit (MacBU, as it was back then) was to have cross-platform compatible documents (it's not 100% but it's way better than the "legacy" versions nightmare)

  • Office Open XML - starting with Office 2007 Win/Office 2008 Mac, Microsoft introduced this format (again, it's not 100%, but it's usually workable)
There's a whole bunch of technical information about Office Open XML on Wikipedia.

Also, starting with Office 2010 Win/Office 2011 Mac, Microsoft started to drop support for "legacy" document versions, citing (I believe), primarily issues around security - hence the issues reported in this discussion.


2017-06-23 at 17:28 #21276   (30)
(2017-06-22 at 22:27)cmm wrote:  We have used Document Converter (in the App Store) to update old Word documents to newer formats. I don't remember having any problems with the app or the conversions.
Thanks for mentioning this. I've encountered a bit of a problem, though. Most, if not all, of my Word 5 files don't have an extension. I can search for them really easily using HoudahSpot, which can search by UTI (since the 4-character file type disappeared in Snow Leopard). What I'd like to do is convert the files in place, i.e. just have Document Converter deposit the converted .doc or .docx files in the same folder. But for some reason, the option "source as destination folder" requires that the original files have an extension. Now I could add an extension pretty easily using a utility like A Better Finder Rename, but when I do so, the UTI changes, and becomes identical to my .doc files that can be read by Word 2015 just fine, making it impossible to find just them.

Can anyone figure out how what the most expedient way of doing this is? I love the fact that DC can retain the original creation/modification date.


Todd Bangerter Show this Post
2017-06-23 at 20:16 #21288   (31)
Todd Bangerter
Does anyone have any thoughts on Document Converter vs. MacLink Plus? I still have MacLink Plus 16 for one day when I hopefully have time to go through the old archives and convert a lot of old Word, WordPerfect, and MacWrite documents. I'd have to fire up a PowerPC-compatible VM or computer for it, though (Snow Leopard or earlier).

Based on the App Store reviews, a lot of people seem to think Document Converter works better though. Can anyone here corroborate that?


2017-06-23 at 23:26 #21295   (32)
(2017-06-22 at 22:27)cmm wrote:  We have used Document Converter (in the App Store) to update old Word documents to newer formats. I don't remember having any problems with the app or the conversions.
Based on CMM's mentioning of this app, I went to the Mac App Store and found "Document Converter" as the first item in a search, read the many excellent reviews and purchased it. On my first use, converting an old ClarisWorks document with embedded graphics, it worked perfectly. Thanks CMM for the tip!


2017-06-24 at 02:17 #21298   (33)
I just migrated my data to an SSD and did an OS upgrade as well. Now, Office 2011 wants me to activate with my key. Using the key returns an error message that it has already been used. Well, sure, it was used on a different drive -- but the same computer.

How do I migrate the activation from the old drive to the new drive?


2017-06-24 at 09:38 #21304   (34)
(2017-06-24 at 02:17)David Blanchard wrote:  I just migrated my data to an SSD and did an OS upgrade as well. Now, Office 2011 wants me to activate with my key. Using the key returns an error message that it has already been used. Well, sure, it was used on a different drive -- but the same computer. How do I migrate the activation from the old drive to the new drive?
There is no deauthorization system to recover the activation from your old drive, so i believe the only way to get Office 2011 reinstalled after a hardware migration is to call Microsoft.

I found this on the web:
Office Installation and Activation support: 800-936-5700


2017-06-24 at 13:23 #21311   (35)
(2017-06-24 at 09:38)Scott Austin wrote:  
(2017-06-24 at 02:17)David Blanchard wrote:  I just migrated my data to an SSD and did an OS upgrade as well. Now, Office 2011 wants me to activate with my key. Using the key returns an error message that it has already been used. Well, sure, it was used on a different drive -- but the same computer. How do I migrate the activation from the old drive to the new drive?
There is no deauthorization system to recover the activation from your old drive, so i believe the only way to get Office 2011 reinstalled after a hardware migration is to call Microsoft.
I found this on the web:
Office Installation and Activation support: 800-936-5700
Thanks. I was hoping to avoid telephone support, but my online searches last night did not reveal any methods that worked (i.e., copying various .plists from old to new drive).

Additional testing confirms your point about activation on old drives. Any drive that I've used to create a clone of my boot system fails to launch Office and asks for a key.

Based on the advice of many here, I should abandon Office. In fact, I did for awhile but found that the various Office-type suites would confound me with subtle differences that mattered.


2017-06-26 at 04:05 #21338   (36)
(2017-06-24 at 09:38)Scott Austin wrote:  
(2017-06-24 at 02:17)David Blanchard wrote:  I just migrated my data to an SSD and did an OS upgrade as well. Now, Office 2011 wants me to activate with my key. Using the key returns an error message that it has already been used. Well, sure, it was used on a different drive -- but the same computer. How do I migrate the activation from the old drive to the new drive?
There is no deauthorization system to recover the activation from your old drive, so i believe the only way to get Office 2011 reinstalled after a hardware migration is to call Microsoft.
I found this on the web:
Office Installation and Activation support: 800-936-5700
You might give this a try:

https://cwl.cc/2012/02/easy-way-to-move-...ffice.html


2017-06-26 at 13:33 #21370   (37)
Three questions about Office 365

It's come to the point that I have to give in to the Office "subscription" model. Not pleased with not owning my software, and in particular I have no use for "cloud based" storage of my docs or any else.
  1. Does installing 365 effect 2011 in any way such as disable, remove, or other things?

  2. I assume that Microsoft is not stupid enough to make the Office file structure incompatible with the earlier version. They did this sometime ago and caught all h*** for doing so. The question is, can Office 2011 read 365 docs and vice versus?

  3. Does anyone have a clue how often Office 365 calls home? Specifically, will I be able to use it without an Internet connection? I often write "disconnected."
I first used an "borrowed" beta version of Word back in the mid 80's to write my dissertation. (MacWrite simply couldn't do it.) It turned out that a friend had bought the first Laserwriter and that document was the first dissertation submitted to the university that was printed not typed .

Anyone who has ever dealt with graduate school dissertations knows that there is a person in that office with a ruler and a style book. Type style, formatting, organization, etc. Any variation required editing and retyping. At 250 pages and with my poor typing skills, the entrepreneurs with excellent skills made good money off doctoral candidates. I submitted my printed (rather than typed) document. The first attempt to reject it was when she said that it wasn't typed. I pointed out that nothing in the style book mentioned that a typed copy was required, just that it met the guidelines. She then found that my margins were off by a quarter of an inch. I changed it, went back to my friend (who was now into showing up the establishment), printed it, and submitted the next day. She was stunned, but could not reject it.

As others have noted, Word has gone from being an excellent tool to a kitchen sink. (I find the parallels between Microsoft and Adobe significant.) Also, as others have testified, the Word format has become inescapable when submitting to most organizations. I write for three different news outlets and am forced by all to deliver documents in Word, each with a different style. I now create with a text editor (BBEdit) and format with Word. I really like LaTex but can't use it anymore.


2017-06-26 at 14:37 #21376   (38)
(2017-06-23 at 17:28)odysseus wrote:  ...Now I could add an extension pretty easily using a utility like A Better Finder Rename, but when I do so, the UTI changes, and becomes identical to my .doc files that can be read by Word 2015 just fine, making it impossible to find just them. Can anyone figure out how what the most expedient way of doing this is? I love the fact that DC can retain the original creation/modification date.
You don't need to use an application to do this. If you know what the filetype is, you can just add .doc or .docx to the end of the file name. Works well in almost all instances.


2017-06-26 at 16:10 #21388   (39)
(2017-06-23 at 17:28)odysseus wrote:  Most, if not all, of my Word 5 files don't have an extension. I can search for them really easily using HoudahSpot, which can search by UTI (since the 4-character file type disappeared in Snow Leopard).
Who said they disappeared? Type/creator codes are still a part of a file's Finder info, even today. It's all a part of the HFS+ file system (don't know if it's been ported forward in APFS).

macOS gives a file extension top priority, but it will fall back to type/creator codes if there is no extension (or, I believe, if the extension doesn't match any installed app). Apps that use modern Cocoa APIs will see UTIs derived from type/creator in the same way they will see UTIs derived from file extension for files that have extensions.

If you have installed Xcode, the GetFileInfo command will show you a file's type/creator codes, if any are present. In your case, with documents created by a Classic app, those code will still be present.

Of course, Word 2016 won't open the document unless it understands the specific type code used by your document. If it doesn't support Word 5 documents, then it almost certainly won't recognize the type code (probably MSW5 or WDBN).

(2017-06-23 at 17:28)odysseus wrote:  the option "source as destination folder" requires that the original files have an extension.
This sounds like a bug. I would suggest you send a feature request (including a detailed description of the problem) to the author. No guarantee they'll add this feature, but they definitely won't if you don't let them know.


Paul Rockwell Show this Post
2017-06-26 at 18:55 #21403   (40)
Paul Rockwell
(2017-06-26 at 13:33)bizbeblu wrote:  Three questions about Office 365...
Disclaimer: I'm a happy Office 365 Home subscriber. The $99/year works very well for the 4 users of the suite in my household.

I'm not sure which Office 365 edition you are considering. My comments below are from the perspective of Office 365 Home.

Does installing 365 effect 2011 in any way such as disable, remove, or other things?
First, there is no "Office 365" install. Office 2016 for Mac is included with your Office 365 subscription.

Office 2016 co-exists with Office 2011. It puts its applications, support files, preferences, etc. in a different location than Office 2011. That's good because it doesn't muck with what's already working. You can run either version of the application.

As a side note, Office 2016 with Office 365 also gives you the ability to store your documents in OneDrive. This is not something that you're going to get with your standalone Office 2011. While you may not think that's useful, consider that the iOS versions of Excel, Word, and PowerPoint (which are pretty capable) can also read and edit those same documents from your OneDrive account. Kind of nice if you're on-the-go. And OneDrive can sync files stored in it to your Mac, just like Dropbox. So you can have a copy of your files both on your desktop/laptop and "in the cloud" for convenience.

I assume that Microsoft is not stupid enough to make the Office file structure incompatible with the earlier version. They did this sometime ago and caught all h*** for doing so. The question is, can Office 2011 read 365 docs and vice versus?
I assume you are talking about when Microsoft introduced the current docx/pptx/xlsx formats, and they had to create a converter app so that Office Mac 2008 (which could only read/write the older formats) could interoperate with them. Yes, that was problematic. But that's not the case here.

As far as I've been able to tell, the same file formats are used in Office 2016 and they appear to be compatible with Office 2011. I've sent documents that I've created to users with older Windows and Mac Office versions and haven't had a complaint. I've been able to open Office 2011 documents with Office 2016 regularly without issue.

Others will have to comment on VBA compatibility - I've not done that. But I have found things like Excel macros do work from older versions.

Does anyone have a clue how often Office 365 calls home? Specifically, will I be able to use it without an Internet connection? I often write "disconnected."
I don't know if Office 2016 calls home or not. It does need to be activated against your Office 365 subscription when you use any one of the Office applications for the first time. This does require internet connectivity. I've not seen any re-activation request once you've activated (and not logged out of your O365 account), and I've not had any problems working while disconnected.

A side note: Microsoft says you can share your O365 Home subscription with "up to 5 users" on Macs/PCs. What they don't make clear is that's 5 activations. Each user consumes 1 activation if they want to use Office to edit documents and access their 1TB of OneDrive storage on each PC/Mac they log into. Two different users on 1 computer = 2 activations. Same 2 users on 2 computers = 4 activations. Obviously this system works best when a user uses Office exclusively on his/her own computer.

And Office 365 Home doesn't let you purchase additional users for your subscription.

However there's good news: You have management of activations through your Office 365 account without having to call Microsoft. If you find you've run out of activations, the owner of the Office 365 subscrpition can see who's using the activations on what machines and free up activations.

From experience (in both work and personal environments), you may not need Office 2011 around for very long after you install 2016. I didn't find anything that Office 2011 did that Office 2016 didn't do or any showstopper problems. And I live in Outlook, Word, Excel and Powerpoint in a Windows-centric environment for my day job.

Of course, your mileage may vary.