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Finder issues
 


2016-08-27 at 23:07 #3932   (1)
Doug
My cat has managed to make the desktop icon for the internal SSD in my MacBook Pro disappear.

Mongo was traipsing across my wireless keyboard while the laptop was in the Finder and before it had gone to a password-protected screen. Mostly this just scrambled the names of some folders I had on the desktop, which was easily resolved. However, his ambulations managed to disappear the desktop icon for my boot drive, an internal SSD. It shows up when I search for it on Spotlight, I have an alias for on my second monitor that is unaffected, and I have full access to the drive via a Finder window or the alias. I've looked in Trash and anywhere else I can think of. I've logged out, rebooted, but the original (not the alias) of my internal SSD boot-drive is nowhere to be found.

How might I recover its icon to the desktop, top right where it belongs?


2016-08-28 at 00:09 #3934   (2)
Finder Menu -> Preferences -> General Tab

Make sure "Hard disks" is checked.


2016-08-28 at 01:30 #3939   (3)
Finder > Preferences > General > Show these items on the desktop:, check Hard disks.


2016-08-28 at 01:31 #3941   (4)
(2016-08-27 at 23:07)Doug wrote:  My cat has managed to make the desktop icon for the internal SSD in my MacBook Pro disappear.
The first thing I'd try would be to go to Finder>Preferences >General and turn "Hard Disks" off and on again. If that doesn't work maybe the icon has got itself pushed off the edge of the screen somewhere. Disconnect your external monitor and try changing the display resolution. Maybe control click on the desktop and try Clean Up By Name. Once you find it you should be able to set everything back the way you like it.


2016-09-12 at 04:50 #5043   (5)
Is there any way to cause the Finder to display the trailing zero in file sizes? I want to see file sizes listed as:

 92.0 MB
170.2 MB
171.9 MB

instead of the default:

   92 MB
170.2 MB
171.9 MB


2017-07-21 at 20:04 #22396   (6)
jmh
Is there any way for a file tag be on the left side of a file or folder in List View? I'd settle for a Tags column view option... if the color dot would render instead of the text name for the color.

I really miss the visual cue of tinted files icons... of the old days. I have never found the current tag style useful.
My eye focuses upon file icons more intuitively than scanning a row to find it's marker.


2017-07-22 at 08:42 #22403   (7)
(2017-07-21 at 20:04)jmh wrote:  Is there any way... I really miss the visual cue of tinted files icons... of the old days. I have never found the current tag style useful.
Path Finder is a Finder alternative from CocoaTech, and it offers traditional coloring (among many other advantages), where an entire name is the color of a tag.


2017-07-22 at 16:25 #22410   (8)
(2017-07-21 at 20:04)jmh wrote:  Is there any way for a file tag be on the left side of a file or folder in List View?
You can drag the columns in any order you'd like. Just grab the label at the top of the column with your mouse.


2017-07-23 at 07:05 #22422   (9)
(2017-07-22 at 16:25)dvhwgumby wrote:  
(2017-07-21 at 20:04)jmh wrote:  Is there any way for a file tag be on the left side of a file or folder in List View?
You can drag the columns in any order you'd like. Just grab the label at the top of the column with your mouse.
That column contains the tag text, not the color. What "jmh" asked for, and what certainly would be nice if possible, is a way to make the tag color appear on the left side of the file or folder icon in list view.


2017-07-23 at 16:34 #22427   (10)
(2017-07-23 at 07:05)RonaldPR wrote:  
(2017-07-22 at 16:25)dvhwgumby wrote:  You can drag the columns in any order you'd like. Just grab the label at the top of the column with your mouse.
That column contains the tag text, not the color. What "jmh" asked for, and what certainly would be nice if possible, is a way to make the tag color appear on the left side of the file or folder icon in list view.
I suspect the reason Apple doesn't put tags on the left is that there can be multiple tags on a file or folder, in up to 7 (?) colors; so on the left side they would mess up the justification of file names unless Apple allowed space for up to 7 (more in the truly general case) overlapped tags as seen now on the right side, a profligate waste of space for most uses/users. On the right, multiple colored tags either shift left into empty space, or cause part of the file name to be elided (replaced with ellipsis)--relatively harmless, and something we're already used to.

Me, I have many files with 2 or 3 (colored) tags, and some with 4 or more. I have files with 15-20 tags, most of those tags being invisible.

Tags are fundamentally different from the erstwhile labels: you could only put one label on a file/folder, whereas you can put an arbitrary number of tags on one. They are far more flexible than labels (including allowing un-colored tags, a godsend for me, see above), but are definitely annoying for users who want to use them in their simplest mode: one tag per file at most.


2017-07-23 at 17:47 #22429   (11)
(2017-07-23 at 16:34)scottyo3921 wrote:  Tags are fundamentally different from the erstwhile labels: you could only put one label on a file/folder, whereas you can put an arbitrary number of tags on one. They are far more flexible than labels (including allowing un-colored tags, a godsend for me, see above), but are definitely annoying for users who want to use them in their simplest mode: one tag per file at most.
Exactly. When color labels were replaced by tags in Mavericks, that was an improvement for some but for others, like me, who used colored icons and later colored labels to quickly identify files visually by color, it was a loss. I used color labels a lot, but I have no use for tags. I now only use the red dots to (temporarily) mark files that are important, that I should not forget, that need attention.


2017-07-24 at 01:51 #22435   (12)
(2017-07-22 at 08:42)Ric Ford wrote:  
(2017-07-21 at 20:04)jmh wrote:  Is there any way... I really miss the visual cue of tinted files icons... of the old days. I have never found the current tag style useful.
Path Finder is a Finder alternative from CocoaTech, and it offers traditional coloring (among many other advantages), where an entire name is the color of a tag.
Also TotalFinder offers colored labels, and other Finder features. XtraFinder is another Finder utility that does this (I believe) and has tons more features, as well, and last I looked, it was free.


kimballk Show this Post
2017-07-24 at 10:32 #22445   (13)
kimballk
It would be easy enough to program both. Click the tag color twice in, say, 5 seconds, and it would apply or substitute, or remove, a label. Hit it one time and it would be a dot tab. Same thing if one used keystroke shortcuts to control tags/labels, as I do (via Automator). (Apple rarely thinks about how to change to a new "improved" way to do something, but also keep the old way. That would minimize the grumbling at a cost of minimal bloat.)

—Kimball Kramer


2017-08-15 at 00:15 #23317   (14)
I have had much trouble ejecting a portable OWC drive that I usually have connected via USB (it never has this problem when I have it connected via FW800). The Finder (OS X 10.9.5; 27" 2010 iMac 11,3 ) will tell me that "one or more applications is using the drive" and then I will need to click Force Eject. But this message even comes up when I have quit all applications and have only the Finder left running.

Does this indicate a problem with the disk or with the USB bus, or neither?


2017-08-15 at 01:05 #23318   (15)
(2017-08-15 at 00:15)Bill Planey wrote:  I have had much trouble ejecting a portable OWC drive that I usually have connected via USB (it never has this problem when I have it connected via FW800). The Finder (OS X 10.9.5; 27" 2010 iMac 11,3 ) will tell me that "one or more applications is using the drive" and then I will need to click Force Eject. But this message even comes up when I have quit all applications and have only the Finder left running. Does this indicate a problem with the disk or with the USB bus, or neither?
It seems to be buggy Finder/OS X behavior. I see the same sort of errors in macOS Sierra, plus long delays and bugs where the volume disappears from the Finder desktop before it has actually been dismounted (and turning off power results in an error message).

I've also seen a lot of bugs with Disk Utility failing to remount volumes, etc.

(One thing to check, though, is Time Machine, which may be using the drive behind your back.)


2017-08-15 at 02:02 #23320   (16)
(2017-08-15 at 01:05)Ric Ford wrote:  It seems to be buggy Finder/OS X behavior. I see the same sort of errors in macOS Sierra, plus long delays and bugs where the volume disappears from the Finder desktop before it has actually been dismounted (and turning off power results in an error message).
I've also seen a lot of bugs with Disk Utility failing to remount volumes, etc.
(One thing to check, though, is Time Machine, which may be using the drive behind your back.)
I have seen this multiple times over several machines. Whilst some may relate to Time Machine, it happens on machines here which don't have Time Machine backups, so it's certainly not the only cause.
It's a quite annoying bug...


2017-08-15 at 08:57 #23326   (17)
Guest
(2017-08-15 at 02:02)trilogy1000 wrote:  
(2017-08-15 at 01:05)Ric Ford wrote:  It seems to be buggy Finder/OS X behavior. I see the same sort of errors in macOS Sierra, plus long delays and bugs where the volume disappears from the Finder desktop before it has actually been dismounted (and turning off power results in an error message).
I've also seen a lot of bugs with Disk Utility failing to remount volumes, etc.
(One thing to check, though, is Time Machine, which may be using the drive behind your back.)
I have seen this multiple times over several machines. Whilst some may relate to Time Machine, it happens on machines here which don't have Time Machine backups, so it's certainly not the only cause.
It's a quite annoying bug...
I see this issue a lot. Now I unmount, wait for the volume to disappear, and wait at least 30 seconds or so before disconnecting it. It happens on any volume from hard drives to USB drives with Time Machine backups or not.


Barry Trudell Show this Post
2017-08-15 at 09:37 #23330   (18)
Barry Trudell
(2017-08-15 at 08:57)Guest wrote:  
(2017-08-15 at 02:02)trilogy1000 wrote:  I have seen this multiple times over several machines. Whilst some may relate to Time Machine, it happens on machines here which don't have Time Machine backups, so it's certainly not the only cause.
It's a quite annoying bug...
I see this issue a lot. Now I unmount, wait for the volume to disappear, and wait at least 30 seconds or so before disconnecting it. It happens on any volume from hard drives to USB drives with Time Machine backups or not.
Is Spotlight turned on for the drive? if there is a lot of indexing going on, I have seen slower eject behaviour even with an SSD as an external drive. "mds" will be active if Activity Monitor is run.


2017-08-15 at 12:15 #23339   (19)
(2017-08-15 at 00:15)Bill Planey wrote:  I have had much trouble ejecting a portable OWC drive that I usually have connected via USB (it never has this problem when I have it connected via FW800). The Finder (OS X 10.9.5; 27" 2010 iMac 11,3 ) will tell me that "one or more applications is using the drive" and then I will need to click Force Eject. But this message even comes up when I have quit all applications and have only the Finder left running. Does this indicate a problem with the disk or with the USB bus, or neither?
This behavior has been a big problem since at least Sierra, if not the previous version. 75% of the time, mounted volumes, especially any flavor of USB, take forever to dismount or they need to be force-ejected. I don't notice this with eSATA, but that's about it. I cannot believe Apple has not addressed this yet.


2017-08-15 at 14:06 #23348   (20)
I have multiple drives connected (USB, Thunderbolt & FireWire) to my laptop when at home. I have seen this issue through at least the last 4 generations of Mac OS X.

You can use a program to look at the usage info and get an idea of what's tying up the drive. I use "What's Keeping Me". I've found that it's usually SpotLight (mdXXXXX), iTunes, Photos (or a background process associated with their operation) or something similar. So, for example, having copied some files or made other changes, Spotlight'll be busy indexing content. Or a Photos-related process will be handling face recognition. Or Time Machine activity. Etc. etc.


Paul Chernoff Show this Post
2017-08-15 at 14:14 #23350   (21)
Paul Chernoff
I have two almost identical disk docks from OWC. One works fine but the other one will always result in the drive refusing to properly eject from the Mac. I started seeing this behavior when I bought a brand new iMac running Sierra.


2017-08-15 at 17:33 #23363   (22)
(2017-08-15 at 12:15)paulv wrote:  This behavior has been a big problem since at least Sierra, if not the previous version. 75% of the time, mounted volumes, especially any flavor of USB, take forever to dismount or they need to be force-ejected. I don't notice this with eSATA, but that's about it. I cannot believe Apple has not addressed this yet.
I have this problem in El Capitan 10.11.6 and, yes, it takes a very long time for drives to eject now and mount. I'm primarily using FireWire 800 for backup drives. If I use a Samsung 64GB USB3 flash drive bar (via the USB 2 slot), it ejects instantly. If I reboot into a partition on the same drive with 10.6.8 Snow Leopard, everything is very snappy once again.

It's been this way since I updated from Snow Leopard to El Capitan.


2017-08-15 at 18:00 #23364   (23)
hrplng
(2017-08-15 at 00:15)Bill Planey wrote:  I have had much trouble ejecting a portable OWC drive that I usually have connected via USB (it never has this problem when I have it connected via FW800).
I have this problem mostly in Snow Leopard in column view if I have the little preview of the file turned on in the next column.
The equivalent is "Show Preview Column" in Sierra, which is in a contextual menu "Show View Options", though I don't tend to mount and unmount drives on that Mac. (I don't use any Mac OSs in between.) In effect, Finder is using the file to generate the preview, and turning off the preview lets the drive unmount. A bug I think, as Finder should be able to handle this seamlessly.

Cheers, L.


2017-08-15 at 21:06 #23368   (24)
In every OS X past Snow Leopard, the Finder does not consistently honor a folder's custom view settings. I turn on Sort by: Snap to Grid on the desktop. I also use it as the default for folders viewed by icon. In both El Capitan and Sierra, icons rarely snap to grid. I have to drag the Finder's View menu down to Clean Up to keep my desktop organized.

I just upgraded an El Capitan Server to Sierra. I tried turning off off Snap to Grid to see if toggling the setting would make it work. While it was off I moved some icons on my desktop. They snapped to grid. I turned it back on, and icons don't snap to grid. I tested a folder: its contents also do the opposite of the setting.

This worked from the 1980's until Lion. ...


2017-08-16 at 07:06 #23376   (25)
(2017-08-15 at 21:06)CyborgSam wrote:  In both El Capitan and Sierra, icons rarely snap to grid. I have to drag the Finder's View menu down to Clean Up to keep my desktop organized.
This behavior is certainly not universal. I use icon view a lot, and icons snap to grid in Finder windows and on the desktop. They did in El Capitan and still do in Sierra.

Annoying, though, is that grid dimensions seem to vary between MacOSX/OSX/macOS versions, but that has been so for many OS versions.


2017-08-16 at 14:51 #23395   (26)
(2017-08-15 at 17:33)Dave G wrote:  It's been this way since I updated from Snow Leopard to El Capitan.
I forgot to mention, I don't use FileVault, Time Machine, or allow Spotlight to search external drives.

Based on the responses, I guess no one has found a fix or workaround for this silly annoyance.


2017-08-16 at 19:22 #23410   (27)
Guest
(2017-08-15 at 21:06)CyborgSam wrote:  In every OS X past Snow Leopard, the Finder does not consistently honor a folder's custom view settings.
I've yet to see that work properly in all versions of OS X, going all the way back to the first release.


2017-08-16 at 20:49 #23417   (28)
(2017-08-16 at 14:51)Dave G wrote:  Based on the responses, I guess no one has found a fix or workaround for this silly annoyance.
Mountain helps by way of making the un-mounting process more informative - when the drive unmounts properly, you are alerted and can then unplug/disconnect without worry. If the drive is being tied up, you'll also be alerted. with the option to retry. You can unmount all external drives with one menu choice. Or, of course, any one drive at a time. You can see at a glance the mount state of all connected drives.

Excellent, non-free, software.


Apothicus Show this Post
2017-08-17 at 11:07 #23436   (29)
Apothicus
(2017-07-21 at 20:04)jmh wrote:  Is there any way for a file tag be on the left side of a file or folder in List View? I'd settle for a Tags column view option... if the color dot would render instead of the text name for the color. I really miss the visual cue of tinted files icons... of the old days. I have never found the current tag style useful.
My eye focuses upon file icons more intuitively than scanning a row to find it's marker.
Yes, there is an app and I use it exclusively for correcting this poor choice that Apple made in the name of simplification; XtraFinder. It's exactly what you need.

Lately Apple seems to be over engineering everything for the idiots of the world, and it's really making it more difficult. These grasshoppers seemed to have learned nothing from their master, SJ.


2017-08-17 at 15:11 #23452   (30)
Guest
(2017-08-17 at 11:07)Apothicus wrote:  
(2017-07-21 at 20:04)jmh wrote:  Is there any way for a file tag be on the left side of a file or folder in List View? I'd settle for a Tags column view option... if the color dot would render instead of the text name for the color. I really miss the visual cue of tinted files icons... of the old days. I have never found the current tag style useful.
My eye focuses upon file icons more intuitively than scanning a row to find it's marker.
Yes, there is an app and I use it exclusively for correcting this poor choice that Apple made in the name of simplification; XtraFinder. It's exactly what you need.
It also requires disabling SIP and therefore should not be used.


2017-08-18 at 13:18 #23486   (31)
(2017-08-17 at 15:11)Guest wrote:  It [XtraFinder] also requires disabling SIP and therefore should not be used.
That's a little strong [in my opinion]. Saying that SIP should not be disabled is up there with saying that nobody should jailbreak their phone — a little too broad a statement.

Like jailbreaking, disabling SIP is okay if you are mindful of security while doing it. SIP, like app sandboxing, helps defend against some forms of attack, and I do consider it valuable. But if you are practicing good security hygiene, you can disable it safely. Don't install apps from any but trusted sources, don't click anything on questionable websites, be very wary of unusual emails, etc.

My personal choice is to leave SIP enabled. I like XtraFinder, but I also like knowing that there is one additional layer of defense against malware, so I've given it up.

I'm also slightly paranoid about software sources. I will not install anything from sites like Cnet Download.com or MacUpdate. I don't trust those sites not to re-pack the apps with their own malware. (Maybe they don't, but there have been just enough bad actors to put me off all of them.) The only sources I trust are the actual app developers' own sites and the Mac App Store.


2017-08-20 at 14:11 #23565   (32)
(2017-08-16 at 20:49)vcayenne wrote:  Mountain helps by way of making the un-mounting process more informative - when the drive unmounts properly, you are alerted and can then unplug/disconnect without worry. If the drive is being tied up, you'll also be alerted. with the option to retry. You can unmount all external drives with one menu choice. Or, of course, any one drive at a time. You can see at a glance the mount state of all connected drives. Excellent, non-free, software.
Vcaynenne,

I appreciate the response, but I don't care enough about this minor annoyance to purchase non-free software. I did make note of the URL though. Hopefully, someone else has a fix or a suggestion as to why this broke in recent OSes.

I lived with 10.6.8 all this time until I upgraded recently to El Cap (not for security reasons, but for hardware and software reasons). I will stay on El Cap as long as possible until I have a good reason to upgrade to the current OS, which may be never if my two 2011 8,3 17" MacBook Pros crap out before then, or if I can find a way to move to Linux (it's close, but not quite there for me yet).


2017-08-30 at 19:58 #24107   (33)
1. Place a file on your desktop.
2. Copy it to another disk. Be sure it still has the same name (that is, there wasn't already a file there with that name!).
3. Create an alias of the desktop file. It'll have the same name, with " alias" added at the end, and it'll be on the desktop too.
4. Get Info for the alias file. It'll show the "Original:" as the first file, on the desktop and original disk.
5. Click on the alias file and drag it over to the exact folder you copied the file to in Step 2. It'll have a '+' symbol in green indicating the alias file will be copied. Drop the file in that folder.
6. Get Info for the alias file copy in the second folder on the separate disk from the original, the one you just created.

OMG. "Original" is now the second file, the one in the folder with the alias!

Just because there is a file in the location to which you are copying an alias with the same name as the alias file's original reference, the alias file is altered to point to that new file! In fact, if you hold down Command before you drop the alias file in the new location, to cause a move instead of a copy, the behavior is the same.

Note that this happens only because there is a file in the destination of the alias copy/move with the same name as the original. For this test case I used a copy of the same file, but even if the files have completely different contents, but the same name, the alias is silently switched to the new file/location.

This is just wrong, wrong, wrong. I can invent plausible scenarios where you could totally screw yourself if you happened to chain a few of these events together in between your hourly Time Machine backups...

Have I missed something? Seems kinda serious to me!


2017-08-30 at 20:27 #24108   (34)
(2017-08-30 at 19:58)mkaufman wrote:  ... OMG. "Original" is now the second file, the one in the folder with the alias! ... This is just wrong, wrong, wrong....
Apple clearly still can't FTFF, even making it worse. I just confirmed the behavior you describe, testing it in macOS Sierra 10.12.6.

I tried the same test with Path Finder, which, by contrast, exhibited the expected and correct behavior.


2017-08-30 at 20:40 #24109   (35)
(2017-08-30 at 19:58)mkaufman wrote:  OMG. "Original" is now the second file, the one in the folder with the alias!
Also verified in 10.12.6. I modified the second file on the USB drive to be certain the alias on the USB drive opened the second file. Thanks for diagnosing this. I've seen copied aliases misbehave but never took the time to figure it out. Another day, another broken feature of macOS that worked for decades.


Danny Coyle Show this Post
2017-08-31 at 11:05 #24134   (36)
Danny Coyle
(2017-08-30 at 20:27)Ric Ford wrote:  
(2017-08-30 at 19:58)mkaufman wrote:  ... OMG. "Original" is now the second file, the one in the folder with the alias! ... This is just wrong, wrong, wrong....
Apple clearly still can't FTFF, even making it worse. I just confirmed the behavior you describe, testing it in macOS Sierra 10.12.6. I tried the same test with Path Finder, which, by contrast, exhibited the expected and correct behavior.
I'm not so sure. I think what's important is understanding what's going on, so you can account for it. For me, the current behavior makes a lot of sense and is generally what I would want. As an example, I use CCC to make bootable backups of my system SSDs. When I boot off the external hard drive, I do not want all the aliases pointing back to the "original" files on the SSD. Others might, but I can't fathom why. There might be times when I want the alias to point to an absolute destination rather than a relative one, but these would be far fewer - I suppose it depends on what a particular person does.


2017-08-31 at 12:48 #24148   (37)
(2017-08-31 at 11:05)Danny Coyle wrote:  I think what's important is understanding what's going on, so you can account for it....
This isn't directly at you, personally, but what's important is:
  1. not changing fundamental OS behavior behind users' backs
  2. not changing decades-long behavior without explanation
  3. giving users a choice and voice, not assuming that whatever some Apple designer happens to personally prefer should be hard-coded and hidden from users, treating them like infants (How about asking the user what to do in ambiguous situations?!)
  4. not #%*@$% confusing users about what is going to happen, creating unexpected, unpredictable or dysfunctional results
Those things are what's important; those things are part and parcel of the original Macintosh principles of design, and those are the things we have lost in recent years as user interface ignoramuses have taken over "design" at Apple.
#userinterface


2017-08-31 at 14:29 #24156   (38)
(2017-08-30 at 19:58)mkaufman wrote:  1. Place a file on your desktop.
2. Copy it to another disk. Be sure it still has the same name (that is, there wasn't already a file there with that name!).
3. Create an alias of the desktop file. It'll have the same name, with " alias" added at the end, and it'll be on the desktop too.
4. Get Info for the alias file. It'll show the "Original:" as the first file, on the desktop and original disk.
5. Click on the alias file and drag it over to the exact folder you copied the file to in Step 2. It'll have a '+' symbol in green indicating the alias file will be copied. Drop the file in that folder.
6. Get Info for the alias file copy in the second folder on the separate disk from the original, the one you just created.

OMG. "Original" is now the second file, the one in the folder with the alias!
You may consider this a bug, but to me it is a great feature. And it isn't new, it has worked this way for a long time.

It works regardless of where the alias is pointing to. That is, it works if the relative path from the alias to the target on the source drive also is resolvable on the target drive.

I think what's going on is that, unlike classic Mac OS, OS X prioritizes the relative path stored in the alias over the HFS file ID. It only uses the file ID as a fallback, when the relative path no longer points to the file.

Try this experiment:
  1. Create an alias to a file.
  2. Move the target file to a different location.
  3. Create a new file with the same name at the original location
  4. Open the alias. Which target does it open?
In classic Mac OS I think it would still point to the original file, even though it was moved. In OS X I think it will point to the new file, in the original location.

But I could be wrong.


2017-08-31 at 14:34 #24157   (39)
(2017-08-31 at 12:48)Ric Ford wrote:  
(2017-08-31 at 11:05)Danny Coyle wrote:  I think what's important is understanding what's going on, so you can account for it....
This isn't directly at you, personally, but what's important is:
  1. not changing fundamental OS behavior behind users' backs
  2. not changing decades-long behavior without explanation
  3. giving users a choice and voice, not assuming that whatever some Apple designer happens to personally prefer should be hard-coded and hidden from users, treating them like infants (how about asking the user what to do in ambiguous situations?!)
  4. not #%*@$% confusing users about what is going to happen, creating unexpected, unpredictable or dysfunctional results ...
I think Apple deserves blame insofar as they provide us with some powerful tools without providing detailed information on the nuances behind them. The “mystery” behind aliases can be clarified with understanding the differences and particular roles that aliases, symbolic links, and hard links play.

The solution to the intent of the original example can probably be better served by using a symbolic link. Aliases are more familiar to us because they are so easy to create, but in some cases, one of the other two would serve the purpose better. Check out the ln terminal command for creating symbolic and hard links.


2017-08-31 at 14:35 #24158   (40)
Guest
(2017-08-30 at 20:27)Ric Ford wrote:  FTFF
In OS X 10.10, it isn't just copying via Finder. Surprisingly, cp, ditto and rsync all do the same thing. Even dd (SetFile required to restore the alias attribute). Locking the original alias before copying doesn't help either, nor does quitting the Finder before copying via command line.

Also, the alias doesn't have to be in the same folder as the copy of the file. The same problem occurs as long as the relative path between the file/file alias is the same in both locations.

It's really messed up.