MacInTouch Reader Reports

Yosemite: Experiences

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Nov. 16, 2014
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Nov. 16, 2014

item.201008

Bill Dekking

Thanks for the answers on my question on the loss of audio, Yes I went to sound preferences, and only the headphones port works - still no audio line out, but I will keep trying to solve my problem. Headphones are better than nothing at this point. Thanks again

Nov. 17, 2014

item.201034

Brian S

Short addendum to David Charlap's discussion of TRIM and kext signing:

Manufacturers don't write their own SSD device drivers, partly because Apple does not provide access to all the headers. Advanced Host Controller Interface (AHCI) is one example. If manufacturers wrote their own Mac SSD device drivers, it is likely the TRIM support would already be there.

item.201040

Ronald Sluiter

Since upgrading to Yosemite, I have issues with my VPN SonicWALL Aventail Connect, which is a Java app on the Mac. It won't recognise the Java 8 environment Oracle offers for Yosemite.

Following fix is not working: SonicWALL Mobile Connect doesn't use Java, so it tells me I am connected, but can't access any content, like Intranet.

Any suggestions?

Try installing JavaForOSX2014-001.dmg.
Solved some Java issues I had with Zimbra desktop.

item.201015

Noah Rosenstein

Re:

Mail in the inbox will often move from inbox and into the trash folder. Sometimes this will happen when I click on the message, it will do this the moment I click on it. Often it happens with no mouse movement at all. This occurred with Mavericks and is even more prevalent in Yosemite. Some days are relatively free of the problem, while other days it can be severe. Anyone else seen this?

If you have a rule to move mail out of the account's inbox into another account's box (folder), Mail will move the original to the trash after moving a copy to the desired box.

item.201017

Colleen Thompson

I've discovered that a large number of my Mail folders are empty. They are all backed by Google apps, and logging into Gmail shows that the messages are still there, Apple Mail just doesn't appear to be revealing them in my folders.

Did you try rebuilding those mailboxes?

item.201032

Michael Blake

Jerry, a question:

I've had messages jump into the trash on their own but only when I've had MailTags enabled; you're not using MailTags by any chance?

item.201064

Jim Robertson

Steven MacDonald raised my hopes about getting email HandOff to work with multiple accounts on the iOS device and the Mac, when he stated,

"I just tested it with Gmail as you described, and the handoff kept it as sending via Gmail, not my iCloud address. Do you have the same accounts available on Mail.app and iOS?"

I spent more than an hour on the phone and in a screen sharing session with a first-level support engineer at Apple today, and we came away with no resolution. He consulted his second-level resource people, who suggested that because I had Mac Mail "composing" preferences set to "Send new messages from: Account of currently selected mailbox", that explained why mail composed to send from my Exchange account was "picked up" by the Mac modified as designated to be sent from my mac.com (iCloud) account. The only trouble with that was that I didn't have the iCloud inbox selected on the Mac. The support rep had me compose a message on my iOS device from each of the 3 accounts on my iPhone; each time I handed it off to the Mac, it acquired my mac.com "send from" address.

He noted that my iCloud account was the first InBox folder nested beneath the global "Inbox" in my Mailboxes list. I tried moving another of the account's Inbox to the first position. That made no difference. So, he had me disable the iCloud account temporarily on the Mac. When I did that, messages were handed off to the Mac to be sent from my Exchange address, only now it was the Exchange account send from address listed for each picked-up message no matter which account it was composed in, on the iOS device.

Once I toggled the mac.com account back on, on the computer, things got even stranger. Messages composed in the iCloud account on the iOS device carried that sending address intact when they were handed to the Mac, but messages composed as being sent from our office's Exchange account were now listed as originating from the external enterprise Exchange server on which I have an account. I'm totally unable to discern any pattern in this, although the anomalies are reproducible from one message composition and handoff to the next. As best I can tell, the settings for all the accounts are correct.

Anyone have any ideas what might be happening here?

item.201036

MacInTouch Reader

Re:

Re: Brad Hurte's note:

I'm not sure this is a Yosemite or Safari issue (or even specifically Yahoo), but it started after installing Yosemite (with all upgrades) on a 2012 MacBook Pro 15" Retina. I've verified through a low-level diagnostic at my local Apple Store that it does not seem to be a hardware issue (and I've had that on a prior MacBook Pro): I've been getting screen artifacts in Safari in the form of a block or stripe of completely garbled or pixellated graphics periodically and randomly. I'm pretty sure it only occurs on Yahoo pages (not just the search page or my.yahoo but other yahoo-run sites). The pixellation goes away if I refresh or restart Safari, though is more likely to come back quicker if I refresh. Anyone else experiencing this?

I've been seeing the same thing occasionally since updating to Yosemite on a 2008 iMac. However, I don't think it's been only in Safari, and I'm positive it has not been only Yahoo-run websites, since I haven't been on any of those lately.

I, too, have a 15-inch MacBook Pro Retina and since upgrading to Yosemite have been experiencing the exact same problem mentioned... small blocks of pixelated interference while using Safari. Random and occasional, it usually happens while in a "news" site that has small varied pictures. Clears if I restart Safari or computer.

item.201067

Bruce Klutchko

I just had a frustrating experience with Safari in Yosemite on a late 2012 Mac Mini with 4 GB RAM and a 1TB hard drive. I found it was "stalling" ever 10 minutes or so, requiring 3 to 4 minutes to come back to life. Sometimes I saw the SPOD, sometimes it was just a regular, motionless cursor.

Everything had been working well and the machine was seemingly without any issues, so I was very unhappy and perplexed as to why this had happened (could it have been related to the death of my Seagate Time Machine drive the previous week?).

The only clue was that Activity Monitor showed Google Talk plugins as being unresponsive, and FaceBook was taking up nearly 2 GB of memory (1.2 GB compressed memory). Killing the FB tab didn't end my misery. Then I saw that I had sometime checked the preference for "Stop plug-ins to save power." (On the Advanced Tab) I may have done this to keep Flash from running when I wasn't paying attention, but the effect was that the Gmail tab was taking minutes to restart the plug-ins.

So if you use Google Talk plugins, be careful about checking that particular preference. It's enough to drive a guy mad. Mad!

item.201054

Jerry Devore

I have a OKI c5500 printer and have, with some help from the web, been able to keep it running through all OS X versions until upgrading to Yosemite. It's been a great little printer (except for handling cardstock). But, with almost total indifference by the manufacture to users needs, I will never buy another one of their products.

item.201066

Adam Newman

I'm just so frustrated...the "wake from sleep" bug that had crept into Mavericks (but seemed to be fixed in one of the updates) is back with a vengeance in Yosemite.

Both of my 3G AppleTV's will simply not wake my iMac... I've got to get up and physically tap the keyboard... then things are fine... but often I get disconnected at different times while watching tv shows or movies or listening to music... must be the time it takes for the iMac to fall back asleep.

Changed the setting to 3 hours before sleep... so will see if that "fixes" it... but still very frustrating to say the least.

item.201024

MacInTouch Reader

Ever since upgrading to Yosemite, our Finder icons remain generic in list view until folders are closed and then reopened. We upgraded from Mountain Lion. Perhaps that's the cause of the problem, but how to correct it?

Possibly related is the behavior of window memory which is also misbehaving, but not always.

item.201072

Stephen Hart

Bill Dekking wrote:

"Thanks for the answers on my question on the loss of audio, Yes, I went to sound preferences, and only the headphone port works - still no audio line out, but I will keep trying to solve my problem. Headphones are better than nothing at this point. Thanks again"

What Mac are you using? Most recent Macs don't have audio out separate from the headphone jack or USB.

item.201062

David Powers

I've upgraded three machines to Yosemite... with it taking ages to download each time, rather than allowing downloading and sharing a dmg.

The two Airs I did on the weekend are doing fine, but the MacBook Pro I did a week earlier, is showing some problems.

Safari has twice hung the whole machine (did a cold boot hours later - the clock didn't even do another tick).

Mail has crashed a couple of times - when it hasn't, it has quickly got up to close to 200 [MB] of (compressed) memory.
And when that isn't a killer, compose several times has got the cursor out of step after the first backspace/delete edit...

The flatter colour would be fine - if it came with performance improvements by avoiding all the 3D, but I have only see performance reduction...

Not too impressed...

item.201063

David Powers

Forgot to mention AirDrop no longer works between my 3 Yosemite MacBooks - seem to be Bluetooth problems - none can see the others in AirDrop (although sharing via 802.11 works).

Also characters in Finder/Safari search windows, and other places, get dropped/lost - yes stolen sometimes, but other times it seems that fast bursts of keystrokes are missed.

Oh yes... And Notes typed on any MacBook don't get shared any more to the others.

Nov. 18, 2014

item.201103

Stephen Hart

Bruce Klutchko wrote

"Then I saw that I had sometime checked the preference for "Stop plug-ins to save power." (On the Advanced Tab) I may have done this to keep Flash from running when I wasn't paying attention, but the effect was that the Gmail tab was taking minutes to restart the plug-ins."

Thanks for that tip. I have noticed a few times in the past weeks that Safari took several seconds to respond to closing a tab. In fact this just happened on a site where I was playing some sound clips (Flash).
I did have Stop plug-ins to save power, and will disable that to see if the pauses stop.

item.201104

Stephen Hart

David Powers wrote:

"I've upgraded three machines to Yosemite... with it taking ages to download each time, rather than allowing downloading and sharing a dmg."

To save the installer, just quit without installing. Then drag a copy to save it. The installer must be in its original location to work. There are instructions available to create a thumb-drive installer if you want to do that.
This is the same as Mavericks installer.

BTW, the flat dock icons and "traffic light buttons" are, as far as I know, cosmetic only.

item.201087

Steven MacDonald

Re:

"...raised my hopes about getting email HandOff to work with multiple accounts on the iOS device and the Mac"

The next thing I would try is set up a test user and log into iCloud and at least one of the other mail accounts. This will attempt to rule out something in your user folder or some corruption in your usual Mail.app preferences that is interfering with Handoff.

item.201111

Victor Staggs

Jerry Devore wants a driver for his OKI C5500 printer. Has he looked at

OKI printer driver compatibility with Mac OS X Mavericks and Yosemite Update

dated November 7 of this year?

item.201115

Christophe T.

Since I installed OS X 10.10, I cannot print anymore on a Canon iR-ADV C5235. The printer sets itself to pause. The latest drivers from Canon are supposed to be compatible with 10.10 but it does not work...

item.201155

MacInTouch Reader

Just a quick warning for those using Konica Minolta Bizhub printers... We've been printing fine since KM released a Yosemite driver a few weeks back, but the 10.10.1 update released today has broken it completely. Everything we print now gets the following error:

Error : Undefined
Offending Command: Get

STACK

/Sofha NupP1
-dictionary-

The update mentions Xerox Driver updates, but there's clearly something shared that got changed. And things had been going so well...

item.201128

Anil Purandaré

I installed Yosemite (on an Early 2008 Mac Pro) two weeks ago and had an odd experience I thought I'd share. I'd had some chronic issues with Mavericks and so decided to do a completely fresh install of Yosemite and recreate user information, rather than use Migration Assistant.

I backed up documents, erased and verified the hard drive, and did the install. I recreated the user scheme for my family that I'd used with Mavericks (two admin accounts and two managed accounts). I created my (admin) account as the initial account post-setup.

I still saw some of the same issues with Yosemite, but only with my account. The issues gave me the impression that some preferences were not getting saved properly. For example, apps I arranged in Launchpad would not stick to their locations, and Launchpad "pages" would intermittently change order; some apps would continue to ask for firewall and Assistive Devices permissions after I'd given them, and some keyboard shortcuts were listed as conflicting with others (but all were default shortcuts).

Since I didn't see these issues with the other accounts, and I was starting afresh anyway, I decided to delete my account (and user folder) from the other admin account, and then create myself a new one. I used the same long and short name, since I thought once my old account was deleted, the names of a new account should not matter. To my surprise, logging in to my new-but-with-the-same-old-name account showed that some of the old settings had been retained (most obviously, I'd set the menu and dock theme to "dark" and it was set that way in the new account), while others had reverted to the defaults as expected (e.g. the desktop background).

Rather bothered by this, I decided to erase and reinstall Yosemite a second time, this time doing the initial setup with an admin account that won't be normally used. For good measure I've made the accounts that used to be admin accounts standard ones this time (I understand this is more secure). So far, everything seems to be working as expected except for one app (Steam) which persists in asking for firewall permissions (so that problem might be specific to that app) and the Yosemite computer name renumbering problem which has been discussed here before.

I must say I was surprised that two freshly-created admin accounts could behave so differently (with the only difference being one was the account initially set up), and that one can delete both an account and its user folder but that some settings are not only retained but will be used if a new account with the same name is created. It makes me wonder if the admin account that's initially created is somehow privileged or saves some of its settings in a location other than the user folder, and whether that's true for other accounts as well.

item.201159

Gary Kellogg

With Yosemite 10.0.0, I noticed a me.com mail account show up at the very bottom of the left sidebar. It is an account that I had never used in any version of Mail -- only years ago when I used Entourage exclusively. I had forgotten the account existed. This is on a new machine with all fresh software installs.

There were two boxes, one for "Drafts" and one called "Hold." I deleted these and the entire account disappeared from the sidebar. I can find no other reference to the account; I don't even have the password for it.

item.201123

Neil Maller

Brian S writes:

"Manufacturers don't write their own SSD device drivers, partly because Apple does not provide access to all the headers. Advanced Host Controller Interface (AHCI) is one example. If manufacturers wrote their own Mac SSD device drivers, it is likely the TRIM support would already be there."

However that doesn't explain why it is possible to successfully enable TRIM support using only Apple's built-in (since Snow Leopard) capability and without such custom device drivers.

item.201136

Manny Veloso

Manufacturers don't write their own SSD device drivers, partly because Apple does not provide access to all the headers

From the link referenced by the TRIM enabler page: "The only way around that would be to write a whole new AHCI stack to replace Apple's code!"

Well, yes. Apple doesn't want you to subclass its driver, so it's keeping it private. You can always write your own AHCI driver/stack instead of hacking on Apple's. It's too much work, so nobody bothers. That doesn't mean it's technically impossible; that means that it's not worth it.

item.201150

Colleen Thompson

I've upgraded three machines to Yosemite...The two Airs I did on the weekend are doing fine, but the MacBook Pro I did a week earlier, is showing some problems.

Safari has twice hung the whole machine (did a cold boot hours later - the clock didn't even do another tick).

Mail has crashed a couple of times - when it hasn't, it has quickly got up to close to 200 [MB] of (compressed) memory.

And when that isn't a killer, compose several times has got the cursor out of step after the first backspace/delete edit...

The flatter colour would be fine - if it came with performance improvements by avoiding all the 3D, but I have only see performance reduction...

Not too impressed...

So if it's working fine on two computers and not on a third, why would you blame the operating system rather than something specific on that one computer? Perhaps the install pushed an if iffy drive over the edge into failure. Perhaps that previous system had some extensions or add-ons that are conflicting.

item.201101

Scott Crick

Re: Brad Hurte's note:

I'm not sure this is a Yosemite or Safari issue (or even specifically Yahoo), but it started after installing Yosemite (with all upgrades) on a 2012 MacBook Pro 15" Retina. I've verified through a low-level diagnostic at my local Apple Store that it does not seem to be a hardware issue (and I've had that on a prior MacBook Pro): I've been getting screen artifacts in Safari in the form of a block or stripe of completely garbled or pixellated graphics periodically and randomly. I'm pretty sure it only occurs on Yahoo pages (not just the search page or my.yahoo but other yahoo-run sites). The pixellation goes away if I refresh or restart Safari, though is more likely to come back quicker if I refresh. Anyone else experiencing this?

I've been seeing the same thing occasionally since updating to Yosemite on a 2008 iMac. However, I don't think it's been only in Safari, and I'm positive it has not been only Yahoo-run websites, since I haven't been on any of those lately.

I, too, have a 15-inch MacBook Pro Retina and since upgrading to Yosemite have been experiencing the exact same problem mentioned... small blocks of pixelated interference while using Safari. Random and occasional, it usually happens while in a "news" site that has small varied pictures. Clears if I restart Safari or computer.

Although I don't doubt that others may be seeing this problem, I do need to counterpoint that I have had Yosemite on my late-2013 MacBook Pro 15" Retina since Day 1, use Safari five to six hours per day and have never seen this issue. My only complaint with Safari in Yosemite is the lack of a title in the window when you only have one tab open.

Nov. 19, 2014

item.201224

Samuel Herschbein

Anil Purandar told about how a newly created account seemed to inherit the preferences of an account just deleted.

First some facts. OS X uses Unix's UID (User ID) to number user accounts, starting at 501 and incrementing. So the account created on install is 501, the next 502, et al. If an account is deleted, its number will be recycled. So if the 501 account is deleted, the next account created will also be 501.

In addition to the UID, Apple uses a Universal Unique ID (UUID) for each account, those are never reused.

There are hidden directories named using the UID. [For example, look in the /Library/Logs/Console folder and] you'll see each UID's... for example 501.

Here's my conjecture: Yosemite doesn't delete all of these UID numbered directories when an account is deleted, so OS X can erroneously associate them with a newly created account using the same UID, meaning the new account is using files created by the old.

Further conjecture: to maximize the chance of deleting all these files, run Onyx to clean caches, restart into Safe Mode, and then restart normally.

item.201217

Bill Dekking

Having stated my difficulties with Yosemite installed on 2008 Mac Pro - I experienced a loss of audio - nothing seemed to work except audio on headphones, and that worked.

Having recently applied the latest upgrade (10.10.1), now I have audio once again!

But I have no idea of how or why I lost audio in the first place. Any ideas?

item.201179

Brian S

Neil Maller wrote:

"However that doesn't explain why it is possible to successfully enable TRIM support using only Apple's built-in (since Snow Leopard) capability and without such custom device drivers."

It's possible because of adventurous users and not because Apple provided a standard UI to accomplish it. Clearly Apple intends to restrict or eliminate such changes (which is understandable, because updates to kernal extensions are typically malware). Kext signing in Yosemite makes it more difficult to support TRIM in non-Apple SSDs.

[A question is, why does Apple prevent use of its TRIM with third-party SSDs, when it obviously works successfully with both Apple's own SSDs and with third-party SSDs that have had TRIM support via hacks to override what appears to be arbitrary Apple restriction on this important functionality (a restriction that is not present in Windows and Unix-based systems apart from OS X)? -Ric Ford]

item.201291

Stephen Magladry

Hey Ric,

Why does Apple disable Trim of third party SSD? Because Apple hasn't officially tested the hardware. Who is to say that some new SSD comes out with a new chipset next month. Apple's Trim, as they have coded it, doesn't work with the new SSD. Then customers would screen bloody murder saying Apple broke my SSD. If enough do, Apple has a class action lawsuit on their hands.

item.201244

George

Question is, why does Apple prevent use of its TRIM with third-party SSDs, when it obviously works successfully with both Apple's own SSDs and with third-party SSDs that have had TRIM support via hacks to override what appears to be arbitrary Apple restriction on this important functionality (a restriction that is not present in Windows and Unix-based systems apart from OS X)?

Apple could easily enable TRIM. Instead, Apple blocks third party SSD TRIM.

SSDs have become inexpensive commodities. Apple charges more, and with third party TRIM blocked, a buyer better buy all the Apple OEM (Samsung made, often enough) the buyer can afford.

Where it hurts most is on old Macs, like my MBPro, that have new utility with a Crucial SSD (and TRIM on Mavericks).

It's a plan. A business plan.

item.201293

Bradley Price

With regards to TRIM support, John Siracusa reports on the most recent episode of Accidental Tech Podcast that Apple engineers found too many variations in the response of different SSDs to TRIM commands, some leading to data loss. Rather than being somehow spiteful, Apple made the conservative decision not to support TRIM on third-party drives based upon those findings, rather than take on support for an unknown number of manufacturers.

Time will tell.

item.201273

Bruce Klutchko

Ric Ford wrote:

A question is, why does Apple prevent use of its TRIM with third-party SSDs, when it obviously works successfully with both Apple's own SSDs and with third-party SSDs that have had TRIM support via hacks to override what appears to be arbitrary Apple restriction on this important functionality (a restriction that is not present in Windows and Unix-based systems apart from OS X)?

On the latest episode of the Accidental Tech Podcast, John Siracusa ad Marco Arment briefly discussed this issue. It was mentioned that Apple allows TRIM only on their own SSDs because their devices and drivers have been proven compatible. There have been situations in the past where data was lost due to TRIM. There are so many different devices and drivers that there still could be a serious risk of data loss if a non-Apple device or driver didn't implement TRIM properly. Apple does this to err on the side of caution.

Siracusa also said that he would't use a third party Kext to enable TRIM on his Samsung 850 SSD because of the security risk of eliminating the Kext signing requirement, even though reports are that this works in terms of data integrity.

I would also love to have an SSD, but worry if it would eventually slow down without enabling TRIM. Have others seen their SSD's slow down after a period of use without TRIM?

item.201233

Joel Schneider

Since upgrading to Yosemite a dialog frequently appears telling me I need to install Java runtime to view this material. It is curious that it frequently appears when I'm not doing anything that could require Java. It seems to at times random.

Similar problem. A message keeps coming up saying "to view this content you need to install Java Runtime". It is installed but it is a pain to permanently erase this message. Help!

item.201187

Dan Y

With the publicity on WiFi issues, such as connections dropping, which I have not experienced, I idly checked my WiFi connection by option-clicking on the menubar icon.

Whereas I used to have a 5GHz connection to my 802.11n Airport Express, it is now choosing the 2.4 GHz band. I don't know when this started; possibly with Yosemite. I'm now running 10.10.1. My computer is 10 feet in front of my router.

I haven't tried any voodoo yet except toggling WiFi on the Mac, to no effect.

item.201272

Dan Y

Re my previous post about a 802.11n 5GHz connection failure, looks like it's not a thing, after all. The subsequent times I have logged out/in, my Mac successfully connects over the 5GHz band, with no changes in the environment. Dunno why the temporary issue, since I had logged out/in after the 10.10.1 upgrade.

item.201190

Jon Rasmussen

Since I installed OS X 10.10, I cannot print anymore on a Canon iR-ADV C5235. The printer sets itself to pause. The latest drivers from Canon are supposed to be compatible with 10.10 but it does not work...

Many of these printers require running the "uninstaller" to remove the old drivers. Restart, then run the new installer. My Fiery installer for our Canon does the same thing. The Canon printers used to require this all the time.

See if that helps.

item.201193

Jim Kessler

I've printed successfully under 10.10 to a Canon imageRunner Advance iR-ADV C5235 printer, using the latest Canon UFR II driver (v10.06.00, November 3, 2014), but we're using LPD/LPR queues (add the printer in Printers & Scanners, select IP, enter the server address, select Line Printer Daemon - LPD) so I can't vouch for other printing schemes. Even double-sided printing and stapling works (if those hardware options are installed and configured in Settings > Options).

item.201201

MacInTouch Reader

"Since I installed OS X 10.10, I cannot print anymore on a Canon iR-ADV C5235. The printer sets itself to pause. The latest drivers from Canon are supposed to be compatible with 10.10 but it does not work... "

This probably isn't what you want to hear, but my spouse and I work at a university and have a Canon ImageRunner Advance C5255 on our local network.

She's using the latest Canon drivers with Yosemite and has no difficulty printing and I'm using the previous Canon drivers (for Mavericks) with Yosemite and also have no trouble printing.

In most cases you only need the UFRII drivers and no other software. Also, in the past when I've had difficulty, I've gone into the MacHD/Library/Printers and deleted everything Canon. That includes Canon files within the PPDs folder. Begin this process by deleting the IRAdvance from your Prints & Scanners system preferences.

Then, reinstall the latest software from Canon and set up the software from scratch.

You didn't say if you upgraded to Yosemite from something older than Mavericks. If so, then deleting everything and starting over is definitely the way to go. Good luck.

item.201231

Christian Olsen

Christophe T. wrote:

Since I installed OS X 10.10, I cannot print anymore on a Canon iR-ADV C5235. The printer sets itself to pause. The latest drivers from Canon are supposed to be compatible with 10.10 but it does not work...

Have you tried the generic print driver? We have a Canon IR C+ and the driver was giving me reams of gibberish every time I tried to print from my new MacMini. Switched to generic and it prints fine, hopefully I won't need to access any of the extras the real printer driver offered until after Canon fixes their Yosemite drivers.

item.201202

MacInTouch Reader

A follow-up to printing issues with Konica Minolta BizHub printers: We found that the update did not affect a Yosemite machine that had no Xerox drivers. We removed the Xerox drivers from the problem machine, deleted and recreated the KonicaMinolta printer, and the issues disappeared.

Maybe the act of recreating the printer was the cure, but I still suspect some issue with the updated Xerox drivers.

item.201205

Jeff Bagby

Re. MacInTouch Reader reporting problems printing to a Konica Minolta BizHub printer after the OS X 10.10.1 update:

I am able to print to a Konica Minolta biz hub C360 under both OS X 10.10 and 10.10.1 using the Konica Minolta Driver v. 3.8.0 that is designed for OS X 10.9.x.

They have posted an OS X 10.10 Driver Schedule, indicating projected release dates for compatible drivers.

I see a 10.10 driver (version 3.9.0) is available for my Biz Hub 360. Just tried it. Still works.

http://onyxweb.mykonicaminolta.com/OneStopProductSupport?appMode=Public

item.201199

Arthur Busbey

I made the mistake of updating a Mac Mini last night that was running a big RAID array for our department. This unit supported sharing for several accounts and, up until the update, was working fine. When I connected I could see the files I had remotely, work on them, download, upload, etc.

After the update to 10.10.1, no matter what directories I connect to, nothing shows in the directory window for the mounted servers.

Tried with several directories connecting from several machines running Yosemite and Mavericks but no luck - the wheel spins in the lower right corner indicating the system is working but no listing of remote files ever appears.

Looks like I will be bringing up my Carbon Copy Cloner backup and leaving Yosemite 10.10.1 alone for a while!

item.201174

Stephen Hart

Anil Purandar wrote:

"... the Yosemite computer name renumbering problem which has been discussed here before."

The issue of a computer renaming itself, supposedly because of another computer with the same name on the same network, predates Yosemite by at least one full OS version and probably more.

I had this problem in Mavericks and Yosemite beta regularly (2-5 only) but it hasn't happened since I set up a new retina iMac and chose a different user name and computer name, and hand-migrated from my old iMac.

Nov. 20, 2014

item.201240

Warren Eig

Re:

To save the installer, just quit without installing. Then drag a copy to save it. The installer must be in its original location to work. There are instructions available to create a thumb-drive installer if you want to do that. This is the same as Mavericks installer.

The installer does not have to be in the original location to work.

item.201242

Colleen Thompson

Bruce Klutchko and Stephen Hart were discussing Safari's "Stop plug-ins to save power" setting, and I got curious about it. I found it on my Mavericks machine in Safari/Preferences/Advanced.

This setting must be on by default, as I don't remember ever checking it, though I could be wrong.

Apple Help about this option is rather opaque:

Freezes plug-ins after a brief time. You can click frozen plug-in content to start the plug-in for a website. The plug-in stays enabled for that website, though other instances of the same plug-in on the current webpage remain temporarily frozen until the page is loaded again. Safari automatically disables plug-ins for a website you don't visit for a few weeks.

To see a list of websites that currently start plug-ins automatically, click Details. Then remove websites from the list to save power.

So you can unfreeze one, say, Flash item on a page by clicking on it. How is one to know they have to reload the page to enable other frozen items on the same page?

What on earth does it mean by Safari disabling plug-ins for a website you don't visit for a few weeks? Is this only if you leave the tab open for that long?

"Details"? There ain't no such button.

I run ClickToPlugin, Ghostery, and AdBlock. I wonder how all those interact with this setting.

item.201281

David Charlap

Ric Ford asks:

"why does Apple prevent use of its TRIM with third-party SSDs, when it obviously works successfully with both Apple's own SSDs and with third-party SSDs that have had TRIM support via hacks to override what appears to be arbitrary Apple restriction on this important functionality (a restriction that is not present in Windows and Unix-based systems apart from OS X)?"

No answer for this in specific, but it's worth noting that this isn't the first time Apple has made such arbitrary decisions.

Those of us who have used Macs back in the old days may remember Apple's "CD SC" system extension, used for accessing Apple's SCSI CD-ROM drives. The extension would only work with Apple drives, and would be updated whenever Apple released a new drive.

People quickly realized that the extension is pretty generic and worked with nearly all (if not literally all) SCSI CD-ROM drives. Except for the fact that it would read the product's ID sting and compare it against a list of supported drives. If the drive isn't on the list, the extension would not access the drive.

The "official" way for third-party drives to work was for them to come bundled with their own extensions. And there were many sold over the years (Charismac's Anubis, LaCie's SilverLining, etc.) both as free bundles and as a part of larger disk utility suites.

But many users quickly realized that they could also use the Apple extension by simply editing the list of names. One could load the extension into ResEdit, and change one of the names on the list to match the drive's own ID string.

Similar situations existed for hard drives - Apple's "HD SC Setup" tool only works on Apple drives, even though the driver it installs is generic and works on everything. Third-party drives would typically come bundled with a similar utility or users would hack the Apple utility.

Today's TRIM support smacks of the same thing.

As for why Apple seems to like this, it's anybody's guess. I think a logical (but not necessarily correct) explanation is that they don't want to have any legal responsibility if someone uses their tool/driver/extension on an incompatible piece of third-party hardware and damage results. By rigging the software such that you need to hack it to work with third-party hardware, they can state (if sued) that they took steps to actively prevent the action that lead to the damage.

Or, if you're more conspiracy-minded, they just want to stop you from buying third-party hardware of any kind. Which is not without evidence (e.g. proprietary SSD boards, soldered-on RAM, pentalobe screws, proprietary chips in cables, etc.), but this is not a theory that I personally believe at this time, because there are also good technical explanations for these practices.

item.201303

Ted McCabe

A conjecture on why Apple doesn't enable TRIM support: Apple's kext may subtly rely on the specific implementation of said support, such that they are aware of some drives that support TRIM but still don't play well with Apple's implementation.

If true, then given the esoteric nature of the problem, it is easier and provides better support for the unwary user (by far the majority) to simply implement that only Apple drives support TRIM, as a generic support could lead to the occasional drive that borks the users system 'cause it implements TRIM just a little bit differently than Apple needs.

Anywho, I think the best question to ask to fix this problem is: if the user is in control of the modification, how does the user sign the changed kext so that it passes the boot check? It must be possible, the question is how onerous are the steps involved?

item.201335

George

Re:

With regards to TRIM support, John Siracusa reports on the most recent episode of Accidental Tech Podcast that Apple engineers found too many variations in the response of different SSDs to TRIM commands, some leading to data loss. Rather than being somehow spiteful, Apple made the conservative decision not to support TRIM on third-party drives based upon those findings, rather than take on support for an unknown number of manufacturers.

Time will tell.

According to Wikipedia there are 12 manufacturers of SSD controllers.

There are some unknown to me, but the main ones are six well known. Probably four market leaders.

Apple could test third-party SSDs for OS X compatibility.

Apple could even set up a program that charged third-party manufacturers to have Apple certify their products.

But we all know Apple never would.

As a purchaser of a Crucial SSD running Chameleon SSD Optimizer on Mavericks in a venerable MacBook Pro, I'm not looking at Apple, if my drive starts dropping bits out its garbage collection chute.

But I'd like to point out there's a much larger potential variety of Windows and Linux operating systems and hardware, and all the modern ones known to me support third-party SSDs and permit TRIM to be enabled.

Last rebuttal: data loss is going to happen on any drive, spinning or solid state.

TRIM and "garbage collection" routines put the inevitable off into the indefinite. Which is, of course, why Apple implements both on the (often Samsung) SSDs built in as OEM. (Teardowns have revealed Samsung and Marvell controllers in recent Mac laptops.)

item.201255

J Ake

Re:

"Since upgrading to Yosemite a dialog frequently appears telling me I need to install Java runtime to view this material. It is curious that it frequently appears when I'm not doing anything that could require Java. It seems to at times random."

Similar problem. A message keeps coming up saying "to view this content you need to install Java Runtime". It is installed but it is a pain to permanently erase this message. Help!

Double check Activity Monitor to see if you don't have some sort of Java app running in the background. This may even be a leftover piece of an install that was removed or (so you thought) disabled at some point.

In my case, it was NexDef, a buggy piece of software that arrived on my machine courtesy of MLB.com for streaming baseball games. Once I figured out how to get rid of NexDef completely, I stopped getting the Java dialog popups.

item.201301

John Baltutis

Re:

Since upgrading to Yosemite a dialog frequently appears telling me I need to install Java runtime to view this material. It is curious that it frequently appears when I'm not doing anything that could require Java. It seems to at times random.

Similar problem. A message keeps coming up saying "to view this content you need to install Java Runtime". It is installed but it is a pain to permanently erase this message. Help!

Download and install JRE SE 6 from Java for OS X 2014-001. You can run JRE SE 6 and SE 7/8 simultaneously.

item.201292

MacInTouch Reader

Use this:

Java for OS X 2014-001 includes installation improvements, and supersedes all previous versions of Java for OS X. This package installs the same version of Java 6 included in Java for OS X 2013-005.

to get rid of the Java message.

item.201237

Bill Dekking

Stephan Hart: thanks for the response, and thanks to all who have responded to my dilemma. My Mac is a 2008 Mac Pro with 10 Gigs RAM and since the most recent OS (10.10.1) upgrade, all audio is working(?). I am still puzzled as to why this happened in the first place. On another drive, I have Snow Leopard installed and all audio works just fine.

item.201275

Stephen Hart

Bill Dekking wrote:

Having stated my difficulties with Yosemite installed on 2008 Mac Pro - I experienced a loss of audio - nothing seemed to work except audio on headphones, and that worked.

Having recently applied the latest upgrade (10.10.1), now I have audio once again!

But I have no idea of how or why I lost audio in the first place. Any ideas?

I'm guessing settings in System Preferences > Sound.

I just bought computer speakers for the first time in several years. I got no sound from them once set up. I had to choose Headphones out in Sound preferences.

item.201282

Jeff Blume

Bill Dekking said:

Having stated my difficulties with Yosemite installed on 2008 Mac Pro - I experienced a loss of audio - nothing seemed to work except audio on headphones, and that worked.

Having recently applied the latest upgrade (10.10.1), now I have audio once again!

But I have no idea of how or why I lost audio in the first place. Any ideas?

I saw the same thing on my Mac Pro (Late 2013). But I have no idea why other than "a bug." But at least it's not just you...  ;-)

item.201277

Stephen Hart

Dan Y wrote:

I idly checked my WiFi connection by option-clicking on the menubar icon.
Whereas I used to have a 5GHz connection to my 802.11n Airport Express, it is now choosing the 2.4GHz band. I don't know when this started; possibly with Yosemite. I'm now running 10.10.1. My computer is 10 feet in front of my router.

AirPort Express and Extreme are, I think, supposed to use whatever band or combination produces the best throughput. At least when set to default.

When I got my Extreme, I hunted around for best practices for setup. I found an extensive blog entry that concluded after days of testing that default setting were best.

A better test, I think, would be to run Oookla Speedtest on your iPhone or MacBook Pro at various places around the house. Then do the same on a Mac connected to the internet with ethernet.

In my case, WiFi speeds are comparable to wired speeds, and both are a little lower than the nominal connection speed reported by the DSL router.

item.201319

Jonathan Saltzman

I, too, have problems with 2.4/5GHz settings on the Airport Extreme Base Station. I am running Mountain Lion 10.8.5, using Airport Utility 7.6.1.

To change to a different channel, Apple Help instructs me to select the base station (done), and then click edit (done).

Click the Wireless tab (done), and then click Wireless Options.

Except there are no Wireless Options. I am just shown the Network Mode, Wireless Network Name, Wireless Security, Wireless Password, Verify Password. No other options are shown except "Cancel" and a dimmed "Update" button.

What am I missing here? My Mac Pro shows Channel 157 (5GHz) and my MacBook Pro (late 2010) shows Channel 4 (2.4 GHz). They are both running on the same network, but neither computers show the "Wireless Options" button.

I am (apparently) at the random mercy of restarting or rebooting the Airport Extreme and/or the computer to get a new random channel. Both computers use the "n" protocol.

How do I change channels? Apple Support is absolutely worthless these days, so I turn to the trusty readers of MacInTouch for possible solutions. Particularly vexing is the lack of a "Wireless Options" button on both computers.

item.201322

Jonathan Saltzman

Addendum: I have updated the Apple Extreme firmware to 7.6.1 and the Airport Utility to 6.3.1. Still no difference. Also, I am unable to launch the Airport Base Station Agent in /System/Library/CoreServices (it shows up now as a generic app icon, so perhaps it is no longer relevant).

item.201341

Adam Newman

The "multiple personality" issue in sharing (where a computer has parentheses with increasing numbers inside) seems to have been resolved with the latest update from Apple... so very good news. Connecting to my iMac from my Macbook Pro (as well as screen sharing) is back in business as long as the iMac isn't asleep.

Which leads to problem 2 - still can't get the iMac to wake on network activity, either my Macbook Pro trying to connect or either of my 3G Apple TV's trying to get media. No love, no way, no how. Gotta physically haul my butt into the study to hit the keyboard to wake the computer.

The iMac is connected by ethernet to our single Extreme Base station. It also has wireless active (because without that on, the Apple TV's won't connect even if it's awake... weird)

I just don't get it, but take some twisted solace to know that I'm not alone... any new ideas out there??

item.201313

MacInTouch Reader

"D T" mentioned the upgrade required for VPN Tracker for use with Yosemite and that it's a paid-for one:

Yep, it is. Which is OK with me generally...

... but the 'upgrade' is 109 Euros (for the Pro version, which is what I have), which is a crazy high price for what is really a basic fix-and-upgrade for a VPN client, no matter how good it is. The 'new' version gets me all of three new features - actually two, as I don't consider 'making it compatible with Yosemite' a 'feature'. The two other remaining new features look cool and may be useful to some people but are pretty minor in my view and aren't things I've ever actively considered needing. This for 109 Euros? All I really want is for the current version to run on Yosemite. And am I going to be hit yet again like this when OS X 10.11 comes out?

Equinux normally feature high in my list of 'good guys'. I love VPN Tracker, it's been an essential tool for me for years, and yes they deserve to be paid for their work, but this one is making me grrrrr... and I have no choice but to pay it unless I want to waste time re-working all my VPN connections/solutions to clients (many).  :-(

Same experience for Equinux VPN Tracker: What could justify a 130 EUR upgrade!?

VPN Tracker just stopped fuctioning; on lauching they ironically display an message saying

"We recommend you upgrade to the latest version of VPN Tracker. Claim your personal upgrade offer today.".

This is not a recommendation: this is an unacceptable way to oblige customer for upgrade at a very high price.
I would accept to pay a small amount paying for Yosemite fix and adpatation but not 130 EUR ....

Details: I bought VPN Tracker 2000 EUR less than one year ago!

Nov. 21, 2014

item.201363

A Kaleberg

One reason Apple might not want users to enable TRIM is that they may have their own ideas of how to manage block allocation on the SSD with Fusion drives.

If I understand TRIM correctly, the idea is that the operating system is expected to tell the SSD's controller when it has freed a block so that the SSD can do smart stuff and improve performance.

This, of course, makes it harder for the operating system to do smart stuff, since it has to precisely model what the drive will do and then out-think it if they want to try a new allocation strategy.

For example, I gather that Fusion drives cache files from the slower hard drive on an all or nothing basis. If Apple wants to be clever and only cache parts of files, they might implement something that looks like a file system, but doesn't behave like a file system with respect to SSD block allocation. Ideally, the SSD of a Fusion drive should always be full or nearly full, but this might put the operating system at odds with the SSD software regarding whether a block is actually free or just almost free.

Right now, Apple does something like this with memory. The idea is that all RAM should be in use. If the memory controller had some clever hinting analogous to TRIM based on process termination or file closure, Mac OS would be hard pressed to keep track of what was where in RAM.

item.201366

Tracy Valleau

A conjecture on why Apple doesn't enable TRIM support: Apple's kext may subtly rely on the specific implementation of said support, such that they are aware of some drives that support TRIM but still don't play well with Apple's implementation.

If true, then given the esoteric nature of the problem, it is easier and provides better support for the unwary user (by far the majority) to simply implement that only Apple drives support TRIM, as a generic support could lead to the occasional drive that borks the users system 'cause it implements TRIM just a little bit differently than Apple needs.

Anywho, I think the best question to ask to fix this problem is: if the user is in control of the modification, how does the user sign the changed kext so that it passes the boot check? It must be possible, the question is how onerous are the steps involved?

Perhaps these links will help:

SandForce Enterprise Flash Controllers

LSI Announces SandForce SF3700...

item.201432

Bill May

I am sure that in the early days of SSDs with imperfect firmware, supporting TRIM would have been a huge support issue for Apple. Staying away in those days made sense. However, SSDs are now more mature products, and supporting TRIM is probably not such an engineering nightmare.

I think at this point, supporting TRIM is now at the level of supporting SATA standards. It is the kind of support one should expect from a modern OS. So, in my view, Apple's failure to support this hardware feature is negligent for a company with industry-leading profit margins.

I think their refusal to support TRIM on non-Apple devices reflects some very foolish thinking by Apple marketing. The marketing department wants you to buy an appliance computer with all Apple components (which you cannot buy as a consumer for any amount of cash) and to never ever upgrade the computer in any way. They want you to buy a new device and throw your old system out when all you need a larger or faster internal storage device. To me, such an approach imposes a very wasteful behavior pattern on users. How can a company be "green" when their policies compel users to buy whole new devices more often than they really need to?

[Based on other postings that suggest technical issues at Apple, I'm wondering if one of two possibilities might be the case: 1) if Apple is doing something unusual in its file system/OS X (HFS+ is clearly, a very different file system from those used in Windows and other Unix implementations) or 2) if Apple may be taking some "shortcuts" in its file-system/driver code that make it less reliable than Unix/Windows drivers/file systems? -Ric Ford]

item.201390

Joseph Gurman

Reader George wrote on the lack of Apple support for TRIM for third-party SSDs:

Apple could test third-party SSDs for OS X compatibility.

Apple could even set up a program that charged third-party manufacturers to have Apple certify their products.

But we all know Apple never would.

Totally aside from Apple's not being in the business of helping third parties who are not their partners make money - unlike, say, Microsoft, which (Xbox and peripherals aside) is not a hardware company - I would suggest that Apple is primarily about user experience (as they call it). In particular, those people who don't know how many SSD OEMs there are, or the differences among the controllers, or the advantage of TRIM.

Apple's concerned with a user being handed a system integrated by a VAR and than losing critical data - and blaming Apple, rather than an unexpected behavior when third-party firmware and hardware are combined with Apple-supported software. That trend, nanny-stateist though it sounds, has been Apple's clear direction over the last couple of decades, and has its purest expression in their retail wtores.

But I would also suggest another reason. Consider Apple's current lineup of Macs: the MacBook Air, the MacBook Pro, the iMac, and Mac Pro literally cannot accommodate an SSD [upgrade] (unless you pry the display off the iMac and disassemble several other components to get at the HD SATA connector). Only the Mini, and then with considerable difficulty (probably way too much for the average user), really makes it straightforward to add an SSD. Apple is (see above) a hardware, not a software company, so when should they spend a dime on software support for products they no longer sell? Only as long as the average (once again) user keeps the older hardware.

As someone fortunate enough to be using newer Apple products at work and to be able to have afforded a new iMac this year, I'd much rather see more third parties producing PCIe flash cards that conform to Apple's (probably unpublished) standards, so I don't have to worry about third-party TRIM support, or trying (almost always unsuccessfully) to update SSD firmware. I realize that a great number of Mac users' mileage will vary, as they have older/more configurable machines, but I think you can see that Apple wants to spend money where it will drive new hardware sales, not where it will encourage the sensible, frugal practice of getting the most out of your hardware as long as it continues to do what you need.

item.201427

Tag Gallagher

That link for Java Runtime 6 leads to a blank page.

Oracle's own site lists about three million varieties, with no clue which to download.

Help!

item.201480

John Baltutis

Tag Gallagher wrote:

"That link for Java Runtime 6 leads to a blank page."

Then, try

http://support.apple.com/kb/DL1572

item.201406

David McLaughlin

I might have a solution to the missing audio problem.
I installed 10.10 on a separate volume to test it out, and the internal audio stopped working, but external audio worked fine (I route "Sound Effects" in Sound to the internal speakers to prevent loud "beeps" from interrupting my music).

Switching back to my production system under 10.8.5, my Mac Pro (early 2008) still had missing internal audio.

Zapping the PRAM fixed the internal audio problem for both the 10.8 and 10.10 systems (and, yes, it is crazy that zapping the PRAM still fixes problems on Mac systems).

Note: I also reset NVRAM at the same time to fix another problem but don't think that it is related to the fix.

item.201446

MacInTouch Reader

Michael Kienitz posted:

Since migrating to 10.10 and now 10.10.1, every time I boot I have to reset my monitors both for arrangement and for the desktop photos. I'm using a 24in Apple and 30-in. Apple monitor... I use it for video editing with the 30in as the boot monitor for timeline etc. and the 24 as a preview monitor... however it switches to the reverse every time I reboot, despite my locking the settings. I'm wondering if anyone else has had this problem or found a solution.

Opening the Displays System Preference, resetting the arrangement and dragging the menu bar over put everything back as it was. You do not need to swap physical connections - just tell the computer how it is going to be through the software. I run dual 23" Cinema Display in the same setup as Bob Currier.

item.201421

John Berry

I'm in the same boat as Rex Raymond, except for using multiple Mission Control spaces (I rarely even look at Mission Control). The blocks of visual noise in Safari are fairly frequent. I think (but I'm not sure) that they are some kind of show-through from one tab or window to another, though often rendered as garbage. I too hope that Apple will fix this problem quickly.

item.201396

Steven MacDonald

I have updated the Apple Extreme firmware to 7.6.1 and the Airport Utility to 6.3.1. Still no difference.

Airport Utility in Yosemite is 6.3.4, but that shouldn't make a difference.
When I click on edit, then Wireless, then Wireless Options, I get a dropdown that contains selections for Country, Radio Mode and Radio Channel for both 2.4 and 5 GHz frequencies.

item.201419

James Cutler

Jonathan Saltzman wrote,

... I am running Mountain Lion 10.8.5, using Airport Utility 7.6.1.
To change to a different channel, Apple Help instructs me to select the base station (done), and then click edit (done).
Click the Wireless tab (done), and then click Wireless Options.
Except there are no Wireless Options. ... but neither computers show the "Wireless Options" button.
... Also, I am unable to launch the Airport Base Station Agent in /System/Library/CoreServices (it shows up now as a generic app icon, so perhaps it is no longer relevant).

I'm a little confused at just what you are seeing. The Wireless Options are not a computer-specific item, but are part of the base station configuration. What model of base station are you using?

Also, there never should be a need to manually launch the Airport Base Station Agent. This is handled by Airport Utility Preferences.

item.201436

David Losada Soler

About the Yosemite Time Machine bug:

Time Machine not working with Yosemite  [Apple Discussions]

For me, Time Machine is totally unusable. Even in a fresh backup on a just formatted disk and with just two copies of history.

item.201415

Stephen Hart

Nate Goldshlag wrote:

"With 10.10.1 Apple did not fix a single one of the various bugs I reported."

I tested Yosemite through all the betas on a working iMac. I officially submitted 22 items with Feedback Assistant. None were show stoppers, but some of the early graphics issues were ugly.

One of those has not been fixed, and that's not Apple's fault. Snap Pro X (with movie) still can't record sound.
If you search for "Yosemite" on Ambrosia's site, you get no hits. If you check the support forums, you might find this:

"We are aware of the incompatibilities between Snapz and Yosemite and while there is an update planned for the near future we cannot give you an ETA of the release."
This is now four months after Yosemite was available to developers.

On the other hand, if you go to Rogue Amoeba's site (Audio Hijack Pro, etc.), you see this:

"All of our applications now support Mac OS X 10.10 (Yosemite). Just be sure you've got our latest updates."

There's a pattern here.

item.201381

Harold Stoddard

J. Ake wrote:

"In my case, it was NexDef, a buggy piece of software that arrived on my machine courtesy of MLB.com for streaming baseball games. Once I figured out how to get rid of NexDef completely, I stopped getting the Java dialog popups."

How did you get rid of NexDef? I can't find it, and Spotlight comes up empty.

item.201382

Samuel Herschbein

Re: VPN Tracker Upgrade for Yosemite

At first I was miffed that VPN Tracker 7 didn't work in Yosemite and by the upgrade price of $139.90 USD. I thought I had recently upgraded to 7 - when I checked my records, it had been over a year. I would have preferred an update to 7, even if it was a paid update, since I don't like Yosemite's new GUI paradigm.

I can't complain about the price given how much I use VPN Tracker: I VPN into several clients every day. VPN Tracker is quick, easy, and very robust. I use it more hours/day than Adobe CC and Office. Since the last paid upgrade my monthly cost is about $9 USD, far cheaper than Adobe CC's $30/mo. USD (academic rate).

I would have preferred an update to 7, even if it was a paid update, since I don't like Yosemite's new GUI paradigm.

My gut feeling is that there just aren't enough customers to keep the quality high and the price low.

item.201377

Stephen Hart

Warren Eig wrote:

"The [Yosemite] installer does not have to be in the original location to work."

Really? I thought it had to be in hard drive/Applications.

item.201324

Joe Gurman

Nate Goldshlag wrote:

"With 10.10.1 Apple did not fix a single one of the various bugs I reported."

Reported during the beta? I have the same experience, but I only reported a couple.

Reported in earlier versions? Join the club there, too.

I don't know the OS development team's priorities, but I'm willing to bet they have something to do with what Apple views as key capabilities (e.g. things connecting iOS devices, where most of the cash comes from these days, to Macs) and things that get reported by lots of people. If anyone has any insight into the prioritization of bug fixing in OS X, I'd love to hear what really goes on.

[Stop reading now if you don't do networked file sharing using NFS; you'll just be bored.] An example of a bug that's been around a year and a half, and which Marcel Bresink of NFS Manager and so many other useful utilities recognized back then, the Directory Utility (located in /System/Library/Core Services/Applications), which has been the GUI method for setting up NFS mounts since 10.8, is no longer able to write to the local Active Directory to modify or add mount points. Since Apple ha virtually never documented how a user is supposed to do anything *ix-y on OS X, if there's a new method, they don't mention it. (Of course, a real *ix aficionado will simply edit /etc/fstab, but auto mounts there sometimes don't stick. (See, I told you you'd be bored.)

TL;DR, the Apple Rep for our large organization told me to resubmit the bug, just so he has a reference to give to the product manager. I'll be interested to see if this goes anywhere.

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